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Recovering Israel's Theology in the New Testament
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(in Polish) Recovering Israel's Theology in the New Testament

General data

Course ID: WT-DTE-WJR Erasmus code / ISCED: 08.2 / (unknown)
Course title: (unknown) Name in Polish: Recovering Israel's Theology in the New Testament
Department: Institute of General Theology
Course groups: Courses at UKSW
ECTS credit allocation (and other scores): (not available)
view allocation of credits
Language: English
Subject level: elementary
Learning outcome code/codes: TMA_W05
TMA_U01
TMA_U17
TMA_U18
TMA_K05
Short description:

The course is devoted to acquainting the participants with the particular theology and rhetoric of the writings of the historical Israel and with their influence upon the New Testament.

Full description:

The standard biblical history, as it is taught during school religious education, was written from the perspective of the writings which were written in Judaea and Jerusalem. The northern territory of Israel is presented therein as the land of apostates from the original, ideal state with its capital in Jerusalem. However, more recent archaeological and literary research reveals a great role of the historical (northern) Israel in the composition of the writings of the Old Testament. Inevitably, questions arise: Did these particular Israelite traditions survive until the times of the New Testament, and did they somehow influence it? Was Jesus a Messiah of the Jews, or of the whole Israel? Did Paul, who originated from the tribe of Benjamin, regard himself as a Jew, or rather as an Israelite? Moreover, a more general and practical question arises: What persuasive techniques were used in biblical writings in order to persuade their recipients to adopt a particular point of view? We will commonly look for answers to these and other questions during the classes.

Bibliography:

Basic:

1. D. E. Fleming, The Legacy of Israel in Judah's Bible. History, Politics, and the Reinscribing of Tradition, Cambridge and New York 2012, 3-35.

2. M. Mor, F. V. Reiterer (eds.), Samaritans: Past and Present. Current Studies, StJud 53, StSam 5, Berlin and New York 2010, 1-41.

Supplementary:

1. I. Finkelstein, The Forgotten Kingdom. The Archaeology and History of Northern Israel, Atlanta 2013, 129-164.

Learning outcomes:

EK 1 (cf. TMA_W05): describes specific features of the theology of the historical Israel

EK 2 (cf. TMA_W05): characterizes the rhetorical techniques adopted in the biblical texts which origate from Israel or refer to Israel

EK 3 (cf. TMA_U01, TMA_K05): compares various presentations of the same issue in various scholarly sources, thus perceiving the need of a multifaceted approach to complex problems

EK 4 (cf. TMA_U17): creates his/her own analysis of a selected scholarly problem, written in Polish or in English on the basis of the literature pertaining to the subject and of the contents of the course

EK 5 (cf. TMA_U18): is able to participate independently and actively in a scholarly discussion, led in English

Participation in classes: 30 hours, preparation for classes: 15 hours, independent analysis of the contents of classes: 30 hours, reading the course literature: 25 hours - totally 100 hours (4 points ECTS)

Assessment methods and assessment criteria:

EK 1 - continuous evaluation and written exam

EK 2 - continuous evaluation and written exam

EK 3 - written exam

EK 4 - written exam

EK 5 - continuous evaluation and checking the list of participants

EK 1 - 2: cannot describe any feature of the theology of the historical Israel, 3: can describe basic features of the theology of the historical Israel, 4: can describe basic features of the theology of the historical Israel and their significance for the writings of the New Testament, 5: can describe detailed features of the theology of the historical Israel and their significance for the writings of the New Testament place within the canon of the New Testament writings, and explain their significance

EK 2 - 2: cannot point to any rhetorical technique adopted in the biblical texts which origate from Israel or refer to Israel, 3: can point to basic rhetorical techniques adopted in the biblical texts which origate from Israel or refer to Israel, 4: can point to detailed rhetorical techniques adopted in the biblical texts which origate from Israel or refer to Israel, 5: can point to detailed rhetorical techniques adopted in the biblical texts which origate from Israel or refer to Israel and explain possible motivation for their use

EK 3 - 2: cannot compare various presentations of the same issue in various scholarly sources, 3: can basically compare various presentations of the same issue in various scholarly sources, 4: can synthetically compare various presentations of the same issue in various scholarly sources, 5: can synthetically and analytically compare various presentations of the same issue in various scholarly sources

EK 4 - 2: cannot create his/her own written analysis of a selected scholarly problem, 3: can create his/her own basic written analysis of a selected scholarly problem, 4: can create his/her own synthetic written analysis of a selected scholarly problem, 5: can create his/her own synthetic and analytical written analysis of a selected scholarly problem

EK 5 - 2: does not participate in a scholarly discussion in the classes or is absent in more than 3 classes, 3: occasionally participates in a scholarly discussion in the classes, 4: frequently participates in a scholarly discussion in the classes, 5: frequently participates in a scholarly discussion in the classes and formulates his/her own scholarly hypotheses

Final assessment: dependent on the realization of learning outcomes: EK 1: 20%, EK 2: 10%, EK 3: 20%, EK 4: 40%, EK 5: 10%

For achieving a positive grade the number of unjustified absences from classes may not exceed 3.

This course is not currently offered.
Course descriptions are protected by copyright.
Copyright by Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski University in Warsaw.