Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski University in Warsaw - Central Authentication System
Strona główna

Methods of research osteological

General data

Course ID: WB-BI-41-34cw
Erasmus code / ISCED: 13.1 Kod klasyfikacyjny przedmiotu składa się z trzech do pięciu cyfr, przy czym trzy pierwsze oznaczają klasyfikację dziedziny wg. Listy kodów dziedzin obowiązującej w programie Socrates/Erasmus, czwarta (dotąd na ogół 0) – ewentualne uszczegółowienie informacji o dyscyplinie, piąta – stopień zaawansowania przedmiotu ustalony na podstawie roku studiów, dla którego przedmiot jest przeznaczony. / (unknown)
Course title: Methods of research osteological
Name in Polish: Metody badań osteologicznych
Organizational unit: Faculty of Biology and Environmental Sciences
Course groups: (in Polish) Przedmioty dla specjalności BC dla I roku II stopnia biologii
ECTS credit allocation (and other scores): 0 OR 4.00 (differs over time) Basic information on ECTS credits allocation principles:
  • the annual hourly workload of the student’s work required to achieve the expected learning outcomes for a given stage is 1500-1800h, corresponding to 60 ECTS;
  • the student’s weekly hourly workload is 45 h;
  • 1 ECTS point corresponds to 25-30 hours of student work needed to achieve the assumed learning outcomes;
  • weekly student workload necessary to achieve the assumed learning outcomes allows to obtain 1.5 ECTS;
  • work required to pass the course, which has been assigned 3 ECTS, constitutes 10% of the semester student load.

view allocation of credits
Language: Polish
Subject level:

elementary

Learning outcome code/codes:

BI2_U04,BI2_K01,BI2_K05

Short description:

This course introduces the concepts and methods used in the analysis of human skeletal remains in archaeological and also forensic contexts. The skills learned in this course provide a basis for more advanced research in comparative anatomy, bioarchaeology, forensic anthropology and paleopathology.

Full description:

The course introduces the concepts and methods used to analyze the remains of human skeletons in an archaeological and forensic context. The skills acquired in this course form the basis for more advanced research in the field of comparative anatomy, bioarcheology, forensic anthropology and paleopathology.

The aim of the course is to familiarize students with the basic techniques of osteological research, the starting point will be classes in which students learn the exact normal anatomy of the human skeleton. In the next stages, students will be introduced to the basic research techniques used in the study of skeletal materials.

During the course, students will be introduced to the following thematic blocks:

1. anatomy of the skeletal system: anatomy of the skull, nonmetrical features of the skull, cranial points, craniometry, anatomy of the primary and permanent dentition, anatomy of the postcranial skeleton, location of muscle attachments, long bone measurements

2. determination of the biological profile: osteobiography, sex assessment, age at death (adults and children), reconstruction of in vivo height and weight, assessment of musculoskeletal stress, pathological changes, taphonomic changes, principles of selection of material for specialist tests (micro- CT, CT, isotope studies, aDNA studies)

3. analysis of materials taken from collective burials, determination of MNI (and. Minimal Number of Individuals), analysis of crematory burials

Bibliography:

Compulsory literature:

Buikstra J.E., Ubelaker D.H. 1994. Standards for data collection from human skeletal remains. Arkansas Archeological Survey Research Series No. 44: Fayetteville.

Hillson S. 1997. Dental Anthropology. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.

Ortner D.J. 2003. Identification of Pathological Conditions in Human Skeletal Remains. Second Edition. Amsterdam: Academic Press.

Additional literature:

Bass WM. 1995. Human Osteology: A Laboratory and Field Manual. 4th edition. Columbia, Missouri: Missouri Archaeological Society.

Brooks S., Suchey J.M. 1990. Skeletal age determination based on the os pubis: a comparison of the Acsádi-Nemeskéri and Suchey-Brooks methods. Human Evolution 5: 227-238.

Bruzek J. 2002. A method for visual determination of sex using the human hip bone. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 117 (2): 157-168.

Hasan A, Palmer RM. 2014. A clinical guide to periodontology: Pathology of periodontal disease. British dental journal (official journal of the British Dental Association) 216 (8): 457-461.

Hengen OP. 1971. Cribra orbitalia: Pathogenesis and probable etiology. HOMO 22: 57-75.

González-Ruibal A. 2014. Contemporary Past, Archeology of the. In: C. Smith (ed.), Encyclopedia of Global Archeology. New York: Springer: 1683-1694.

Hauser R, Smoliński J, Gos T. 2005. The estimation of stature on the basis of measurements of the femur. Forensic Science International 147 (2-3): 185-190.

Hershkovitz I, Latimer B, Dutour O, Jellema LM., Wish-Baratz S, Rothschild C, Rothschild BM. 1997. Why do we fail in aging the skull from the sagittal suture? American Journal of Physical Anthropology 103 (3): 393-399.

Khandare SV, BhiseSS, Shinde AB. 2015. Age estimation from cranial sutures - a Postmortem study. International J. of Healthcare and Biomedical Research 3 (3): 192-202.

Krenz-Niedbała M, Kozłowski T. 2011. Comparing the Chronological Distribution of Enamel Hypoplasia in Rogowo, Poland (2nd century AD) Using Two Methods of Defect Timing Estimation. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 23 (4): 410-420.

Lyman RL. 2008. Quantitative Paleozoology. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.

Mariotti V, Milella M, Orsini E, Trirè A, Ruggeri A. Fornaciari G, Minozzi S, Caramella D, Albisinni U, Gnudi S, Durante S, Todero A, Boanini E, Rubini K, Bigi A, Belcastro MG. 2013. Osteobiography of a 19th century elderly woman with pertrochanteric fracture and osteoporosis: a multidisciplinary approach. Collegium Antropologicum 37 (3): 985-994.

Ruff CB, Scott WW, Liu AY. 1991. Articular and diaphyseal remodeling of the proximal femur with changes in body mass in adults. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 86 (3): 397-413.

Salis N, Massa Dettoni E, Fulcheri E, Rabino Massa E. 2005. Pathological lesions attributable to vitamin deficiency in skeletal remains from Puy St. Pierre (Briançon, France). International Journal of Anthropology 20 (3-4): 325-329.

Sierp I, Henneberg M. 2016. Reconstruction of body height from the skeleton: Testing a dozen different methods for consistency of their results. Antropologischer Anzeiger 73 (1): 7-21.

Szczepanek A. 2013. Archeotanatology of collective burials from prehistory to modern times. Collectio Archaeologica Ressoviensis 25. Rzeszów.

Šlaus M, Strinovič D, Pecina-Šlaus N. Brkic H, Baličevic D, Petrovečki V, Pecina TC. 2007. Identification and analysis of human remains recovered from wells from the 1991 War in Croatia. Forensic Science International 171: 37-43.

Waldron T. 2009. Palaeopathology: Cambridge Manuals in Archeology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

van der Merwe AE, Steyn M, Maat GJR. 2010. Adult scurvy in skeletal remains from late 19th century mineworkers in Kimberley, South Africa. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 20 (3): 307-316.

Vodanović M, Brkić H., Slaus M, Demo Z. 2005. The frequency and distribution of caries in the mediaeval population of Bijelo Brdo in Croatia (10th-11th century). Archives of Oral Biology 50 (7): 669-680.

Efekty kształcenia i opis ECTS:

Skill Effects:

Objective effect 1 - the student is able to use the knowledge he has in the field of normal anatomy of the skeletal system, can make observations, can make an interpretation of the anomalies observed on the bone material, can use various sources for this purpose, correctly formulate conclusions from osteological tests

Effects in the field of social competences:

Subject effect 2 - the student is ready to make a critical analysis of his knowledge, understands that in working on osteological materials it is necessary to constantly update it, the student knows how to use appropriate research methods and where to look for new analytical opportunities

Subject effect 3 - the student is ready to determine the order of tasks and priorities resulting from the specificity of the analyzed research material, is ready to implement the research tasks assigned to him

Assessment methods and assessment criteria:

Assessment criteria:

Final test, which will consist of single-choice test questions, preparation of an anatomo-anthropological analysis of the material under study (correctness of the anatomical description of the skeleton, completeness and correctness of the reconstruction of the osteobiography)

The final grade will be the arithmetic mean of the grades obtained from the test and the research project

Scoring tests and final project:

100-94% - 5

93-88% - 4.5

87-80 - 4

79-70% - 3.5

69-60% - 3

59 and less - 2

Skills:

For the grade 2 (ndst): the student does not know the basic issues of the anatomy of the skeletal system, is not able to use his knowledge, is not able to observe and interpret the changes observed on the bone material, does not formulate conclusions from osteological tests or they are incorrect

To grade 3 (dst): the student has a sufficient knowledge of the anatomy of the skeletal system, makes observations to a limited extent and is able to partially interpret them, is able to sufficiently summarize his observations, drawing conclusions from the conducted analyzes

To grade 4 (db): the student has a good understanding of the anatomy of the skeletal system, performs observations and analyzes to a limited extent, and is relatively good at interpreting them and drawing final conclusions from the analyzes performed

To grade 5 (very good): the student knows the anatomy of the skeletal system very well, efficiently makes observations and analyzes, interprets his observations in a clear and synthetic manner and draws comprehensive conclusions

Social competence:

To grade 2 (ndst): the student is not ready to critically assess his knowledge, does not understand the need to perform osteological analyzes, cannot use the discussed research methods, does not know where and how to look for information about them, cannot define tasks and their order in during anatomo-anthropological analysis, does not follow orders

For grade 3 (dst): the student is willing to make a critical assessment of his knowledge to a limited extent, understands the need to perform osteological analyzes, but his orientation in research methods is limited, he / she determines the order of tasks correctly partially, carries out orders although he needs a little more time

To grade 4 (db): the student is ready to make a critical assessment of his knowledge, understands the need to perform osteological analyzes, is well versed in research methods, correctly determines the sequence of tasks, carries out instructions

To grade 5 (very good): the student is ready to make a critical assessment of his knowledge in the field of osteology, understands the need to perform osteological analyzes, is very well versed in research methods, very efficiently determines the order of tasks, efficiently and fully correctly carries out orders

Practical placement: (in Polish)

Nie dotyczy

Classes in period "Winter semester 2019/20" (past)

Time span: 2019-10-01 - 2020-01-31
Choosen plan division:


magnify
see course schedule
Type of class:
Classes, 60 hours, 20 places more information
Coordinators: Justyna Marchewka-Długońska
Group instructors: Justyna Marchewka-Długońska
Students list: (inaccessible to you)
Examination: examination
Type of subject:

obligatory

(in Polish) Grupa przedmiotów ogólnouczenianych:

(in Polish) nie dotyczy

Short description:

This course introduces the concepts and methods used in the analysis of human skeletal remains in archaeological and also forensic contexts. The skills learned in this course provide a basis for more advanced research in comparative anatomy, bioarchaeology, forensic anthropology and paleopathology.

Full description:

The course introduces the concepts and methods used to analyze the remains of human skeletons in an archaeological and forensic context. The skills acquired in this course form the basis for more advanced research in the field of comparative anatomy, bioarcheology, forensic anthropology and paleopathology.

The aim of the course is to familiarize students with the basic techniques of osteological research, the starting point will be classes in which students learn the exact normal anatomy of the human skeleton. In the next stages, students will be introduced to the basic research techniques used in the study of skeletal materials.

During the course, students will be introduced to the following thematic blocks:

1. anatomy of the skeletal system: anatomy of the skull, nonmetrical features of the skull, cranial points, craniometry, anatomy of the primary and permanent dentition, anatomy of the postcranial skeleton, location of muscle attachments, long bone measurements

2. determination of the biological profile: osteobiography, sex assessment, age at death (adults and children), reconstruction of in vivo height and weight, assessment of musculoskeletal stress, pathological changes, taphonomic changes, principles of selection of material for specialist tests (micro- CT, CT, isotope studies, aDNA studies)

3. analysis of materials taken from collective burials, determination of MNI (and. Minimal Number of Individuals), analysis of crematory burials

Bibliography:

Compulsory literature:

Buikstra J.E., Ubelaker D.H. 1994. Standards for data collection from human skeletal remains. Arkansas Archeological Survey Research Series No. 44: Fayetteville.

Hillson S. 1997. Dental Anthropology. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.

Ortner D.J. 2003. Identification of Pathological Conditions in Human Skeletal Remains. Second Edition. Amsterdam: Academic Press.

Additional literature:

Bass WM. 1995. Human Osteology: A Laboratory and Field Manual. 4th edition. Columbia, Missouri: Missouri Archaeological Society.

Brooks S., Suchey J.M. 1990. Skeletal age determination based on the os pubis: a comparison of the Acsádi-Nemeskéri and Suchey-Brooks methods. Human Evolution 5: 227-238.

Bruzek J. 2002. A method for visual determination of sex using the human hip bone. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 117 (2): 157-168.

Hasan A, Palmer RM. 2014. A clinical guide to periodontology: Pathology of periodontal disease. British dental journal (official journal of the British Dental Association) 216 (8): 457-461.

Hengen OP. 1971. Cribra orbitalia: Pathogenesis and probable etiology. HOMO 22: 57-75.

González-Ruibal A. 2014. Contemporary Past, Archeology of the. In: C. Smith (ed.), Encyclopedia of Global Archeology. New York: Springer: 1683-1694.

Hauser R, Smoliński J, Gos T. 2005. The estimation of stature on the basis of measurements of the femur. Forensic Science International 147 (2-3): 185-190.

Hershkovitz I, Latimer B, Dutour O, Jellema LM., Wish-Baratz S, Rothschild C, Rothschild BM. 1997. Why do we fail in aging the skull from the sagittal suture? American Journal of Physical Anthropology 103 (3): 393-399.

Khandare SV, BhiseSS, Shinde AB. 2015. Age estimation from cranial sutures - a Postmortem study. International J. of Healthcare and Biomedical Research 3 (3): 192-202.

Krenz-Niedbała M, Kozłowski T. 2011. Comparing the Chronological Distribution of Enamel Hypoplasia in Rogowo, Poland (2nd century AD) Using Two Methods of Defect Timing Estimation. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 23 (4): 410-420.

Lyman RL. 2008. Quantitative Paleozoology. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.

Mariotti V, Milella M, Orsini E, Trirè A, Ruggeri A. Fornaciari G, Minozzi S, Caramella D, Albisinni U, Gnudi S, Durante S, Todero A, Boanini E, Rubini K, Bigi A, Belcastro MG. 2013. Osteobiography of a 19th century elderly woman with pertrochanteric fracture and osteoporosis: a multidisciplinary approach. Collegium Antropologicum 37 (3): 985-994.

Ruff CB, Scott WW, Liu AY. 1991. Articular and diaphyseal remodeling of the proximal femur with changes in body mass in adults. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 86 (3): 397-413.

Salis N, Massa Dettoni E, Fulcheri E, Rabino Massa E. 2005. Pathological lesions attributable to vitamin deficiency in skeletal remains from Puy St. Pierre (Briançon, France). International Journal of Anthropology 20 (3-4): 325-329.

Sierp I, Henneberg M. 2016. Reconstruction of body height from the skeleton: Testing a dozen different methods for consistency of their results. Antropologischer Anzeiger 73 (1): 7-21.

Szczepanek A. 2013. Archeotanatology of collective burials from prehistory to modern times. Collectio Archaeologica Ressoviensis 25. Rzeszów.

Šlaus M, Strinovič D, Pecina-Šlaus N. Brkic H, Baličevic D, Petrovečki V, Pecina TC. 2007. Identification and analysis of human remains recovered from wells from the 1991 War in Croatia. Forensic Science International 171: 37-43.

Waldron T. 2009. Palaeopathology: Cambridge Manuals in Archeology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

van der Merwe AE, Steyn M, Maat GJR. 2010. Adult scurvy in skeletal remains from late 19th century mineworkers in Kimberley, South Africa. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 20 (3): 307-316.

Vodanović M, Brkić H., Slaus M, Demo Z. 2005. The frequency and distribution of caries in the mediaeval population of Bijelo Brdo in Croatia (10th-11th century). Archives of Oral Biology 50 (7): 669-680.

Wymagania wstępne:

-

Classes in period "Winter semester 2020/21" (past)

Time span: 2020-10-01 - 2021-01-31
Choosen plan division:


magnify
see course schedule
Type of class:
Classes, 60 hours more information
Coordinators: Justyna Marchewka-Długońska
Group instructors: Justyna Marchewka-Długońska
Course homepage: https://teams.microsoft.com/l/meetup-join/19%3ameeting_NzI0NGUzMjctYzhkNS00MjhhLTkyNjYtZGQ0YmI3NGU0YWI0%40thread.v2/0?context=%7b%22Tid%22%3a%2212578430-c51b-4816-8163-c7281035b9b3%22%2c%22Oid%22%3a%2288d9ab88-0e4f-4da7-b675-4fb73fd9211f%22%7d
Students list: (inaccessible to you)
Examination: graded credit
(in Polish) E-Learning:

(in Polish) E-Learning

Type of subject:

obligatory

(in Polish) Grupa przedmiotów ogólnouczenianych:

(in Polish) nie dotyczy

Short description:

This course introduces the concepts and methods used in the analysis of human skeletal remains in archaeological and also forensic contexts. The skills learned in this course provide a basis for more advanced research in comparative anatomy, bioarchaeology, forensic anthropology and paleopathology.

Full description:

The course introduces the concepts and methods used to analyze the remains of human skeletons in an archaeological and forensic context. The skills acquired in this course form the basis for more advanced research in the field of comparative anatomy, bioarcheology, forensic anthropology and paleopathology.

The aim of the course is to familiarize students with the basic techniques of osteological research, the starting point will be classes in which students learn the exact normal anatomy of the human skeleton. In the next stages, students will be introduced to the basic research techniques used in the study of skeletal materials.

During the course, students will be introduced to the following thematic blocks:

1. anatomy of the skeletal system: anatomy of the skull, nonmetrical features of the skull, cranial points, craniometry, anatomy of the primary and permanent dentition, anatomy of the postcranial skeleton, location of muscle attachments, long bone measurements

2. determination of the biological profile: osteobiography, sex assessment, age at death (adults and children), reconstruction of in vivo height and weight, assessment of musculoskeletal stress, pathological changes, taphonomic changes, principles of selection of material for specialist tests (micro- CT, CT, isotope studies, aDNA studies)

3. analysis of materials taken from collective burials, determination of MNI (and. Minimal Number of Individuals), analysis of crematory burials

Bibliography:

Compulsory literature:

Buikstra J.E., Ubelaker D.H. 1994. Standards for data collection from human skeletal remains. Arkansas Archeological Survey Research Series No. 44: Fayetteville.

Hillson S. 1997. Dental Anthropology. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.

Ortner D.J. 2003. Identification of Pathological Conditions in Human Skeletal Remains. Second Edition. Amsterdam: Academic Press.

Additional literature:

Bass WM. 1995. Human Osteology: A Laboratory and Field Manual. 4th edition. Columbia, Missouri: Missouri Archaeological Society.

Brooks S., Suchey J.M. 1990. Skeletal age determination based on the os pubis: a comparison of the Acsádi-Nemeskéri and Suchey-Brooks methods. Human Evolution 5: 227-238.

Bruzek J. 2002. A method for visual determination of sex using the human hip bone. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 117 (2): 157-168.

Hasan A, Palmer RM. 2014. A clinical guide to periodontology: Pathology of periodontal disease. British dental journal (official journal of the British Dental Association) 216 (8): 457-461.

Hengen OP. 1971. Cribra orbitalia: Pathogenesis and probable etiology. HOMO 22: 57-75.

González-Ruibal A. 2014. Contemporary Past, Archeology of the. In: C. Smith (ed.), Encyclopedia of Global Archeology. New York: Springer: 1683-1694.

Hauser R, Smoliński J, Gos T. 2005. The estimation of stature on the basis of measurements of the femur. Forensic Science International 147 (2-3): 185-190.

Hershkovitz I, Latimer B, Dutour O, Jellema LM., Wish-Baratz S, Rothschild C, Rothschild BM. 1997. Why do we fail in aging the skull from the sagittal suture? American Journal of Physical Anthropology 103 (3): 393-399.

Khandare SV, BhiseSS, Shinde AB. 2015. Age estimation from cranial sutures - a Postmortem study. International J. of Healthcare and Biomedical Research 3 (3): 192-202.

Krenz-Niedbała M, Kozłowski T. 2011. Comparing the Chronological Distribution of Enamel Hypoplasia in Rogowo, Poland (2nd century AD) Using Two Methods of Defect Timing Estimation. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 23 (4): 410-420.

Lyman RL. 2008. Quantitative Paleozoology. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.

Mariotti V, Milella M, Orsini E, Trirè A, Ruggeri A. Fornaciari G, Minozzi S, Caramella D, Albisinni U, Gnudi S, Durante S, Todero A, Boanini E, Rubini K, Bigi A, Belcastro MG. 2013. Osteobiography of a 19th century elderly woman with pertrochanteric fracture and osteoporosis: a multidisciplinary approach. Collegium Antropologicum 37 (3): 985-994.

Ruff CB, Scott WW, Liu AY. 1991. Articular and diaphyseal remodeling of the proximal femur with changes in body mass in adults. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 86 (3): 397-413.

Salis N, Massa Dettoni E, Fulcheri E, Rabino Massa E. 2005. Pathological lesions attributable to vitamin deficiency in skeletal remains from Puy St. Pierre (Briançon, France). International Journal of Anthropology 20 (3-4): 325-329.

Sierp I, Henneberg M. 2016. Reconstruction of body height from the skeleton: Testing a dozen different methods for consistency of their results. Antropologischer Anzeiger 73 (1): 7-21.

Szczepanek A. 2013. Archeotanatology of collective burials from prehistory to modern times. Collectio Archaeologica Ressoviensis 25. Rzeszów.

Šlaus M, Strinovič D, Pecina-Šlaus N. Brkic H, Baličevic D, Petrovečki V, Pecina TC. 2007. Identification and analysis of human remains recovered from wells from the 1991 War in Croatia. Forensic Science International 171: 37-43.

Waldron T. 2009. Palaeopathology: Cambridge Manuals in Archeology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

van der Merwe AE, Steyn M, Maat GJR. 2010. Adult scurvy in skeletal remains from late 19th century mineworkers in Kimberley, South Africa. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 20 (3): 307-316.

Vodanović M, Brkić H., Slaus M, Demo Z. 2005. The frequency and distribution of caries in the mediaeval population of Bijelo Brdo in Croatia (10th-11th century). Archives of Oral Biology 50 (7): 669-680.

Wymagania wstępne:

Knowledge of the anatomy of the skeletal system with muscle attachments.

Classes in period "Winter semester 2021/22" (past)

Time span: 2021-10-01 - 2022-01-31
Choosen plan division:


magnify
see course schedule
Type of class:
Laboratory, 60 hours more information
Coordinators: Justyna Marchewka-Długońska
Group instructors: Justyna Marchewka-Długońska
Students list: (inaccessible to you)
Examination: graded credit
(in Polish) E-Learning:

(in Polish) E-Learning (pełny kurs)

Type of subject:

obligatory

(in Polish) Grupa przedmiotów ogólnouczenianych:

(in Polish) nie dotyczy

Short description: (in Polish)

Kurs wprowadza pojęcia i metody stosowane w analizie szczątków ludzkich szkieletów w kontekście archeologicznym i kryminalistycznym. Umiejętności zdobyte na tym kursie stanowią podstawę bardziej zaawansowanych badań w dziedzinie anatomii porównawczej, bioarcheologii, antropologii sądowej i paleopatologii.

Full description: (in Polish)

Kurs wprowadza pojęcia i metody stosowane w analizie szczątków ludzkich szkieletów w kontekście archeologicznym i kryminalistycznym. Umiejętności zdobyte na tym kursie stanowią podstawę bardziej zaawansowanych badań w dziedzinie anatomii porównawczej, bioarcheologii, antropologii sądowej i paleopatologii.

Celem kursu jest zaznajomienie studentów z podstawowymi technikami badań osteologicznych, punktem wyjścia będą zajęcia, na których studenci zapoznają się z dokładną anatomią prawidłową ludzkiego szkieletu. W kolejnych etapach studenci zostaną zapoznani z podstawowymi technikami badawczymi wykorzystywanymi w badaniach materiałów szkieletowych.

W czasie zajęć studenci zostaną zapoznani z następującymi blokami tematycznymi:

1. anatomia układu kostnego: anatomia czaszki, cechy niemetryczne czaszki, punkty kraniologiczne, kraniometria, anatomia uzębienia mlecznego i stałego, anatomia szkieletu postkranialnego, lokalizacja przyczepów mięśniowych, pomiary kości długich

2. określenie profilu biologicznego: osteobiografia, ocena płci, ocena wieku w chwili śmierci (dorosłych i dzieci), rekonstrukcja przyżyciowej wysokości i masy ciała, ocena stresu mięsniowo-szkieletowego, zmiany patologiczne, zmiany tafonomiczne, zasady selekcji materiału do badań specjalistycznych (micro-CT, CT, badania izotopowe, badania aDNA)

3. analiza materiałów podjętych z pochówków zbiorowych, określanie MNI (and. Minimal Number of Individuals), analiza pochówków ciałopalnych

Bibliography: (in Polish)

Literatura obowiązkowa:

Buikstra J.E., Ubelaker D.H. 1994. Standards for data collection from human skeletal remains. Arkansas Archeological Survey Research Series No. 44: Fayetteville.

Hillson S. 1997. Dental Anthropology. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.

Ortner D.J. 2003. Identification of Pathological Conditions in Human Skeletal Remains. Second Edition. Amsterdam: Academic Press.

Literatura dodatkowa:

Bass WM. 1995. Human Osteology: A Laboratory and Field Manual. 4th edition. Columbia, Missouri: Missouri Archaeological Society.

Brooks S., Suchey J.M. 1990. Skeletal age determination based on the os pubis: a comparison of the Acsádi-Nemeskéri and Suchey-Brooks methods. Human Evolution 5: 227-238.

Bruzek J. 2002. A method for visual determination of sex using the human hip bone. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 117(2): 157-168.

Hasan A, Palmer RM. 2014. A clinical guide to periodontology: Pathology of periodontal disease. British dental journal (official journal of the British Dental Association) 216(8): 457-461.

Hengen OP. 1971. Cribra orbitalia: Pathogenesis and probable etiology. HOMO 22: 57-75.

González-Ruibal A. 2014. Contemporary Past, Archaeology of the. W: C. Smith (red.), Encyclopedia of Global Archaeology. New York: Springer: 1683-1694.

Hauser R, Smoliński J, Gos T. 2005. The estimation of stature on the basis of measurements of the femur. Forensic Science International 147(2-3): 185-190.

Hershkovitz I, Latimer B, Dutour O, Jellema LM., Wish-Baratz S, Rothschild C, Rothschild BM. 1997. Why do we fail in aging the skull from the sagittal suture? American Journal of Physical Anthropology 103(3): 393-399.

Khandare SV, BhiseSS, Shinde AB. 2015. Age estimation from cranial sutures – a Postmortem study. International J. of Healthcare and Biomedical Research 3(3): 192-202.

Krenz-Niedbała M, Kozłowski T. 2011. Comparing the Chronological Distribution of Enamel Hypoplasia in Rogowo, Poland (2nd century AD) Using Two Methods of Defect Timing Estimation. International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 23(4): 410-420.

Lyman RL. 2008. Quantitative Paleozoology. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.

Mariotti V, Milella M, Orsini E, Trirè A, Ruggeri A. Fornaciari G, Minozzi S, Caramella D, Albisinni U, Gnudi S, Durante S, Todero A, Boanini E, Rubini K, Bigi A, Belcastro MG. 2013. Osteobiography of a 19th century elderly woman with pertrochanteric fracture and osteoporosis: a multidisciplinary approach. Collegium Antropologicum 37(3): 985-994.

Ruff CB, Scott WW, Liu AY. 1991. Articular and diaphyseal remodeling of the proximal femur with changes in body mass in adults. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 86(3): 397- 413.

Salis N, Massa Dettoni E, Fulcheri E, Rabino Massa E. 2005. Pathological lesions attributable to vitamin deficiency in skeletal remains from Puy St. Pierre (Briançon, France). International Journal of Anthropology 20(3-4): 325-329.

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Wymagania wstępne: (in Polish)

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