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Human factor in transport systems

Informacje ogólne

Kod przedmiotu: WF-PS-HFTS-ER Kod Erasmus / ISCED: 14.4 / (brak danych)
Nazwa przedmiotu: Human factor in transport systems
Jednostka: Instytut Psychologii
Grupy: Grupa przedmiotów - oferta Erasmus
Wykłady monograficzne - Psychologia
Punkty ECTS i inne: 6.00
Język prowadzenia: angielski
Poziom przedmiotu:

zaawansowany

Symbol/Symbole kierunkowe efektów uczenia się:

PS_W02

PS_W03

PS_K03

Skrócony opis:

Transport psychology is a part of psychology that studies the relationship between psychological processes and the behavior of users of various means of transporting people remotely. It aims to apply the theoretical aspects of psychology to improve the flow and quality of traffic by helping to develop and apply accident prevention measures, as well as by targeting desired behaviors through education and motivation of users. Behavior is often studied in conjunction with crash tests to assess causes and differences involved in the collision. In addition, research on factors such as attention, memory, spatial cognition, inexperience, stress, intoxication, distracting / ambiguous stimuli, fatigue and secondary tasks are used to understand and examine the experiences and activities of users of selected modes of transport.

Pełny opis:

1. Aviation - Human Factors Issues in Air Transportation, Aviation Safety and Risk Analysis

2. Aviation – Human Factors Issues in Air Traffic Management

3. Aviation- Recent Methodological Developments and Results from Psychophysiology in Ergonomics

4. Aviation- Human-machine interaction, human-in-the-loop simulation

5. Maritime - Communication and Cognitive Performances

6. Maritime - Human Diversity

7. Maritime - Training and Work Simulations

8. Maritime - Safety at sea: human factors aboard ship

9. Road - Highly Automated Driving - Aspects of Driver Vehicle Interaction

10. Road - Perception and Control Issues in the Design of Advanced Driving

11. Road - Driver State Detection and Simulated Driving: Drawbacks and Opportunities

12. Road- Electric Vehicles: New Challenges for Human Machine Interaction

13. Rail- Train driver distraction and Inattention

14. Rail- Human Factors in Rail

15. Rail: Naturalistic and Simulator HF Driving Communities

16. Rail - Accident Analysis and Prevention

Transporting people at a distance provides a variety of problems, with particular emphasis on human-machine interactions in a dynamically changing environment. On the one hand, technological development is meeting the need to overcome huge distances as quickly as possible, on the other, it imposes a new burden on both operators and participants and users of transport systems.

Vehicle equipment, simulators use for training, interoperability of intelligent systems with humans or, finally, weaknesses and strengths of a human being in a collision with a technical agent play extremely important in transport systems, especially in the context of improving safety, it will focus on human-machine interactions in various situations emphasizing safety , convenience and efficiency in every task to contribute to human-centered design.

The lecture will be focused on the one hand on the unit (driver, pilot, driver, ship operator), on the other it represents a technology-based approach focused on the requirements for proper human use in the context of safety and comfort and on the third hand it will represent a systemic approach providing an integrated perspective the entire system (operator environment - vehicle - environment). The lecture will address people who work in roads and railways, aviation and the maritime sector, highlighting some of the latest trends in human factors and ergonomics. In addition, knowledge of the human factor in understanding relationships and safety levels is gaining importance both in scientific research and in the development of modern and future transport systems, including road and rail vehicles, as well as air and sea transport. Significant progress concerns both modern accident analysis methods, vehicle automation, distractions and distractions, safety, situational awareness, development and training of skills and workload.

Knowledge about the human factor in understanding relationships and safety levels gains importance in both scientific research and the development of modern and future transport systems, including both road and rail vehicles as well as air and sea transport. Significant progress concerns both modern methods of accident analysis, vehicle automation, distraction and distractors factors, safety, situational awareness, development and training of skills and workload.

Literatura:

Aviation

1. Anderson, G. E. (1918). Aeroplane accidents. Journal of the Royal Navy Medical Service, 1, 51-68.

2. Boeing. (2003). Statistical summary of commercial jet aircraft accidents. Seattle WA: Author.

3. Dekker, S. (2014). The Field Guide to Understanding 'Human Error'. Farnham: Ashgate.

4. Garrett, J. W., Teizer, J. (2009). Human factors analysis classification system relating to human error awareness taxonomy in construction safety. Journal of Construc- tion Engineering & Management, 135, 8, 754-763.

5. Goglia, J. J., & Stolzer, A. J. (2016). Safety Management Systems in Aviation. London: Routledge.

6. Gower, Hillson, D., & Murray-Webster, R. (2008). Managing group risk attitude. Aldershot: Gower. ICAO. (2009). Safety Management Manual (2nd ed.). Quebec: ICAO

7. Harris, D. 2011. Human Performance on the Flight Deck. Aldershot: Ashgate.

8. Harris, D., and N. A. Stanton. 2010. “Aviation as a System of Systems: Preface to the Special Issue of Human Factors in Aviation.” Ergonomics 53 (2):145–148. doi:10.1080/00140130903521587.

9. Salmon, P. M., G. H. Walker, G. J. Read, N. Goode, and N. A. Stanton. 2017. “Fitting Methods to Paradigms: are Ergonomics Methods Fit for Systems Thinking?” Ergonomics 60 (2):194–205. doi:10.1080/ 00140139.2015.1103385.

10. Schmid, D., and N. A. Stanton. 2018. “How Are Laser Attacks Encountered in Commercial Aviation? A Hazard Analysis Based on Systems Theory.” Safety Science 110:178–191. doi:10.1016/ j.ssci.2018.08.012.

11. Short, C., Tchouamou Njoya, E., & Hubbard, N. (2019). Safety Risk Attitudes in Commercial Aviation. In R. Charles, & D. Golightly (Eds.), Contemporary Ergonomics and Human Factors 2019 Chartered Institute of Ergonomics & Human Factors

12. Stanton, N. A., D. Harris, and A. Starr. 2016. “The Future Flight Deck: Modelling Dual, single and Distributed Crewing Options.” Applied Ergonomics 53:331–342. doi:10.1016/j.apergo.2015.06.019.

13. Stanton, N. A., and C. Harvey. 2017. “Beyond Human Error Taxonomies in Assessment of Risk in Sociotechnical Systems: A New Paradigm with the EAST ’Broken-Links’ Approach.” Ergonomics 60 (2):221–233. doi:10.1080/00140139.2016.1232841.

14. Stanton, N. A., K. L. Plant, A. P. Roberts, C. Harvey, and T. G. Thomas. 2016. “Extending Helicopter Operations to Meet Future Integrated

15. Updegrove, J.A. and Jafer, S. (2017). Optimization of air traffic control training at the Federal Aviation Administration Academy. Aerospace, vol. 4, iss. 4. Availa- ble at: https://www.mdpi.com/2226-4310/4/4/50

Maritime:

1. Acock, A. C. 2005. “Working with Missing Values.” Journal of Marriage and Family 67 (4): 1012–1028. doi:10.1111/ jomf.2005.67.issue-4.

2. Akhtar, M. J., and I. B. Utne. 2015. “Common Patterns in Aggregated Accident Analysis Charts from Human Fatigue-Related Groundings and Collisions at Sea.” Maritime Policy & Management 42: 186–206. doi:10.1080/ 03088839.2014.926032.

3. Antonsen, S., P. Almklov, and J. Fenstad. 2008. “Reducing the Gap between Procedures and Practice: Lessons from a Successful Safety Intervention.” Safety Science Monitor 12: 1–16.

4. Beus, J. M., S. C. Payne, M. E. Bergman, and W. Arthur Jr. 2010. “Safety Climate and Injuries: An Examination of Theoretical and Empirical Relationships.” Journal of Applied Psychology 95: 713–727. doi:10.1037/a0019164. Bieder, C., and M. Bourrier. 2013. Trapping Safety into Rules. How Desirable or Avoidable Is Proceduralization? Farnham: Ashgate.

5. Operations.” Safety Science 47: 569–577. doi:10.1016/j.ssci.2008.07.002.

6. Hofmann, D. A., and A. Stetzer. 1996. “A Cross-level Investigation of Factors Influencing Unsafe Behaviors and Accidents.” Personnel Psychology 49: 307–339. doi:10.1111/peps.1996.49.issue-2.

7. Grech, M. R., T. J. Horberry, and T. Koester. 2008. Human Factors in the Maritime Domain. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press.

8. Karahalios, H., Z. L. Yang, and J. Wang. 2015. “A Risk Appraisal System regarding the Implementation of Maritime Regulations by a Ship Operator.” Maritime Policy & Management 42: 389–413. doi:10.1080/ 03088839.2013.873548.

9. King, J. 1979. “The Adequacy of Ships and the Competence of Seaman.” Maritime Policy & Management 6 (1): 1–3.

10. Mullen, J. 2004. “Investigating Factors that Influence Individual Safety Behavior at Work.” Journal of Safety Research 35: 275–285. doi:10.1016/j.jsr.2004.03.011.

11. Reason, J. 1997. Managing the Risks of Organizational Accidents. Farnham: Ashgate.

Rundmo, T. 1996. “Associations between Risk Perception and Safety.” Safety Science 24: 197–209.

12. Schröder-Hinrichs, J. U., E. Hollnagel, and M. Baldauf. 2012. “From Titanic to Costa Concordia—

13. A Century of Lessons Not Learned.” WMU Journal of Maritime Affairs 11 (2): 151–167. Shapell, S. A., and D. A. Wiegmann. 2001. “Applying Reason: The Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS).” Human Factors and Aerospace Safety 1: 59–86.

14. Weick, K. E., and K. M. Sutcliffe. 2007. Managing the Unexpected. Resilient Performance in an Age of Uncertainty. 2nd San Francisco: John Wiley & Sons.

Zohar, D. 1980. “Safety Climate in Industrial Organizations: Theoretical and Applied Implications.” Journal of Applied Psychology 65: 96–102. doi:10.1037/0021-9010.65.1.96.

Road:

1. Aworemi J. R., Adegoke A-A. I., Oyedokun A. J., & Adewoye J. O., (2010). “Efficacy of Drivers’ Fatigue on Road Accident in Selected Southwestern States of Nigeria”. International Business Research. Vol. 3, No. 3; July 2010.

2. Canadian Automobile Association (CAA) “Distracted Driving laws in Canada”. https://www.caa.ca/distracted- driving/distracted-driving-laws-incanada/Accessed 6/27/2017 .

3. Daziano R. A., Sarrias M., & Leard B., (2017). “Are consumers willing to pay to let cars drive for them? Analysing response to Autonomous vehicles”. Transportation Research Part C 78 (2017) 150–164.

4. Decker J. S., Stannard S. J., McManus B., Wittig S. M. O., Sisiopiku V. P., & Stavrinos D., (2015). “The Impact of Billboards on Driver Visual Behavior: A Systematic Literature Review”. PMC. NCBI.

5. Durić P., & Miladinov-Mikov M. (2008) “Some characteristics of drivers having caused traffic accidents”. Med Pregl. 61(9- 10):464-9. 3062 Accessed 12/28/2017

Edquist J., (2008). “The Effects of Visual Clutter on Driving Performance”. Accident Research Center. Monash University.

6. Foss R. D., & Goodwin A.H., (2014). “Distracted Driver Behaviors and Distracting Conditions Among Adolescent Drivers: Findings from a Naturalistic Driving Study”. Kyriakidis M., Happee R., & de Winter J.C.F. (2015). “Public opinion on automated driving: Results of an international questionnaire among 5000 respondents”. Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour. Volume 32, July 2015, Pages 127-140.

7. Mofolasayo A., (2019). ‘A research guide for using the efficiency of technological innovations in automobiles to establishing unbiased policies for improvement of minimum safety standards for driver operated motor vehicles.’ Proceedings of the 53rd Annual Conference. Canadian Transportation Research Forum (Accepted). Vancouver, May 2019

8. Roberts P., Boddington K., Rodwell L., & Jorgensen D., (2013). “Impact of Roadside Advertising on Road Safety – Austroads Research Report” Austroads Publication No. AP-R420-13.

9. Roess R. P., Prassas E. S., & McShane W. R., (2011) “Traffic Engineering – Fourth Edition”. Pearson Higher Education Inc. NJ. Sewell R. A., Poling J., & Sofuoglu M., (2009). “The effect of Cannabis compared with Alcohol on driving” PMC. US National Library of Medicine. National Institute of Health

10. Sung N. M., & Rios M., (2015). World Economic Forum. “How South Korea has dramatically reduced road deaths”.

11.

Young M. S., & Mahfoud J. M., (2007). “Driven to distraction: Determining the effect of roadside advertisement on driver attention”. Ergonomics Research Group, School of Engineering and Design, Brunel University.

Rail:

1. Anund, A., Fors, C., Kecklund, G., Leeuwen, W. V., and Akerstedt, T. (2015). Countermeasures for Fatigue in Transportation: A Review of Existing Methods for Drivers on Road, Rail, Sea and in Aviation. VTI Report 852A. Available online at: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Wessel_MA_Van_Leeuwen/publication/274703015_Countermeasures_for_fatigue_in_transportation_-_a_review_of_existing_methods_for_drivers_on_road_rail_sea_and_in_aviation/links/552b6c5a0cf29b22c9c1aa0f.pdf

2. British Rail Safety and Standards Board (2016b). Fitness for Duty Checks and Predicting the Likelihood of Experiencing Fatigue. Available online at: https://www.rssb.co.uk/Pages/research-catalogue/PB025460.aspx

3. Cebola, N., Golightly, D., Wilson, J. R., and Lowe, E. (2013). “Fatigue, anxiety, performance for on-call safety critical decision makers in rail maintenance: a diary study,” in Rail Human Factors: Supporting Reliability, Safety and Cost Reduction, eds N. Dadashi, A. Scott, J.R. Wilson, and A. Mills (Boca Raton, FL: Taylor and Francis Group), 328–336.

4. Cercarelli, L. R., and Ryan, G. A. (1996). “Long distance driving behaviour of Western Australian drivers,” in Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Fatigue and Transportation: Engineering, Enforcement and Education Solutions, ed L. Hartley (Fremantle, WA: Promaco Conventions Pty), 35–45.

5. Dunn, N., and Williamson, A. (2012). Driving monotonous routes in a train simulator: the effect of task demand on driving performance and subjective experience. Ergonomics 55, 997–1008. doi: 10.1080/00140139.2012.691994

6. Fan, J., and Smith, A. P. (2017). “The impact of workload and fatigue on performance,” in International Symposium on Human Mental Workload: Models and Applications, eds L. Longo and M. C. Leva (Cham: Springer), 90–105.

7. Fan, J., and Smith, A. P. (2018). The mediating effect of fatigue on work-life balance positive well-being in railway staff. Open J. Soc. Sci.

8. Kecklund, L., Ingre, M., Kecklund, G., Söderström, M., Åkerstedt, T., Lindberg, E., et al. (2001). “The TRAIN-project: railway safety and the train driver information environment and work situation – a summary of the main results,” in Paper Presented at the Signalling Safety 2001 (London).

9. *Kibblewhite, C. (2003) A Qualitative Study of Factors Contributing to Train Driver Inattention and Distraction. MSc thesis, Cranfield University, Cranfield.

10. Kogi, K., and Ohta, T. (1975). Incidence of near accidental drowsing in locomotive driving during a period of rotation. J. Hum. Ergol. 4, 65–76. doi: 10.11183/jhe1972.4.65

11. CREAM analysis of hazardous incidents occurring on approach to rail signals. Safety Sci. 66, 92–100. doi: 10.1016/j.ssci.2014.02.003

12. Ugajin, H. (1999). Human factors approach to railway safety. Q. Rep. RTRI 40, 5–8. doi: 10.2219/rtriqr.40.5

13. Young, M. S., Brookhuis, K. A., Wickens, C. D., and Hancock, P. A. (2015). State of science: mental workload in ergonomics. Ergonomics58, 1–17. doi: 10.1080/00140139.2014.956151

14. Zoer, I., Ruitenburg, M. M., Botje, D., Frings-Dresen, M. H., and Sluiter, J. K. (2011). The associations between psychosocial workload and mental health complaints in different age groups. Ergonomics 54, 943–952. doi: 10.1080/00140139.2011.606920

Efekty kształcenia i opis ECTS:

Students should demonstrate a good level of initial knowledge of human factor in transport systems and be interested in this topic. It will also be important to be able to debate with the teacher about the theoretical foundations and practical applications of issues related to the role of man in various modes of transport. It will also be necessary to prepare competent Power Point presentations covering various aspects of human behavior in situations related to the movement of a man at a distance using an airplane, ship, car and stack.

Knowledge - the student lists and describes the main currents and research paradigms occurring in transport psychology; identifies the most important issues related to human functioning in various transport environments (soil, water, air) correctly indicates the results of research justifying individual theoretical positions; knows and understands what is the analysis and interpretation of human behavior in the context of committed errors and violations, knows and understands the contemporary importance of the functioning of transport

Skills - is able to interpret the texts of scientific empirical articles; knows how to search and select sources that will be used to enrich his knowledge and skills, the student is able to choose the appropriate techniques for testing and assessing the efficiency of psychological functions of operators and passengers of various modes of transport

Competences - strives for scientific and compliant methodology for collecting empirical data, maintains criticism of existing interpretations of phenomena that are not justified by empirical research, as well as is aware of the research restrictions existing in transport psychology, related to the complexity of human functioning in various environments.

credits:

participation in the lecture: 60

collecting data and preparing a comparative analysis of various theoretical trends in traffic psychology: 60

preparation for the exam (together with compulsory reading): 60

Total hours:

120 [180: 30 = 4] NUMBER OF ECTS: 6

Metody i kryteria oceniania:

Criteria: Knowledge (PS_W02, PS_W04):

- for grade 2 (ndst.): the student does not know and does not understand what is the difference in interpretation of the operator's and trip participants' behavior in various difficult and extreme situations, does not distinguish between various types of errors and violations committed by both platform and passengers. Cannot combine a specific research approach with its theoretical foundations or identify the strengths and weaknesses of various theoretical approaches and research techniques in relation to flying personnel

- for grade 3 (dst.):

student knows and understands what is the difference in interpreting the behavior of the operator and travel participants in various difficult and extreme situations, correctly distinguishes different types of errors and violations committed by both the operator and travel participants. It can quite correctly combine a specific research approach with its theoretical foundations and indicate the strengths and weaknesses of various theoretical approaches and research techniques in relation to flying personnel

- for grade 4 (db), the student knows and understands well what is the difference in interpretation of the operator's and travel participants' behavior in various difficult and extreme situations, well distinguishes between various types of errors and violations committed by both the operator and travel participants. He can properly combine a specific research approach with his theoretical foundations and indicate the strengths and weaknesses of various theoretical approaches and research techniques in relation to flying personnel

- for grade 5 (very good):) the student knows and understands very well what is the difference in interpreting the behavior of the operator and travel participants in various difficult and extreme situations, well distinguishes between various types of errors and violations committed by both the operator and travel participants. It is very apt to combine a specific research approach with its theoretical foundations and precisely indicate the strengths and weaknesses of various theoretical approaches and research techniques in relation to flying personnel.

credits:

participation in the lecture: 60

collecting data and preparing a comparative analysis of the functioning of transport psychology in selected countries: 60

preparation for the exam (together with compulsory reading): 60

Total hours: 180 [180: 30 = 6] NUMBER OF ECTS: 6

The final grade consists of:

1. Assessment of the semester exam

2. Assessment of activity during classes

Two absences per semester are allowed. Excessive absences must be made up in the form agreed with the teacher before the scheduled date of the semester exam. If you do not work out, you will not be allowed to take the exam. The semester test has a written form and contains open-ended questions that require solutions to problems. The condition of passing the exam is to obtain a minimum of 60% of points. The final grade is the grade from the semester exam, which can be increased by 0.5 or 1 grade if the student receives the appropriate number of points for activity during the classes.

Praktyki zawodowe:

without apprenticeships

Zajęcia w cyklu "Semestr zimowy 2020/21" (zakończony)

Okres: 2020-10-01 - 2021-01-31
Wybrany podział planu:


powiększ
zobacz plan zajęć
Typ zajęć: Wykład monograficzny, 30 godzin, 30 miejsc więcej informacji
Koordynatorzy: Włodzimierz Strus, Agnieszka Szymańska, Olaf Truszczyński
Prowadzący grup: Olaf Truszczyński
Lista studentów: (nie masz dostępu)
Zaliczenie: Przedmiot - Egzaminacyjny
Wykład monograficzny - Egzaminacyjny
E-Learning:

E-Learning (pełny kurs) z podziałem na grupy

Typ przedmiotu:

fakultatywny dowolnego wyboru

Grupa przedmiotów ogólnouczenianych:

nie dotyczy

Skrócony opis:

Transport psychology is a part of psychology that studies the relationship between psychological processes and the behavior of users of various means of transporting people remotely. It aims to apply the theoretical aspects of psychology to improve the flow and quality of traffic by helping to develop and apply accident prevention measures, as well as by targeting desired behaviors through education and motivation of users. Behavior is often studied in conjunction with crash tests to assess causes and differences involved in the collision. In addition, research on factors such as attention, memory, spatial cognition, inexperience, stress, intoxication, distracting / ambiguous stimuli, fatigue and secondary tasks are used to understand and examine the experiences and activities of users of selected modes of transport.

Pełny opis:

1. Aviation - Human Factors Issues in Air Transportation, Aviation Safety and Risk Analysis

2. Aviation – Human Factors Issues in Air Traffic Management

3. Aviation- Recent Methodological Developments and Results from Psychophysiology in Ergonomics

4. Aviation- Human-machine interaction, human-in-the-loop simulation

5. Maritime - Communication and Cognitive Performances

6. Maritime - Human Diversity

7. Maritime - Training and Work Simulations

8. Maritime - Safety at sea: human factors aboard ship

9. Road - Highly Automated Driving - Aspects of Driver Vehicle Interaction

10. Road - Perception and Control Issues in the Design of Advanced Driving

11. Road - Driver State Detection and Simulated Driving: Drawbacks and Opportunities

12. Road- Electric Vehicles: New Challenges for Human Machine Interaction

13. Rail- Train driver distraction and Inattention

14. Rail- Human Factors in Rail

15. Rail: Naturalistic and Simulator HF Driving Communities

16. Rail - Accident Analysis and Prevention

Transporting people at a distance provides a variety of problems, with particular emphasis on human-machine interactions in a dynamically changing environment. On the one hand, technological development is meeting the need to overcome huge distances as quickly as possible, on the other, it imposes a new burden on both operators and participants and users of transport systems.

Vehicle equipment, simulators use for training, interoperability of intelligent systems with humans or, finally, weaknesses and strengths of a human being in a collision with a technical agent play extremely important in transport systems, especially in the context of improving safety, it will focus on human-machine interactions in various situations emphasizing safety , convenience and efficiency in every task to contribute to human-centered design.

The lecture will be focused on the one hand on the unit (driver, pilot, driver, ship operator), on the other it represents a technology-based approach focused on the requirements for proper human use in the context of safety and comfort and on the third hand it will represent a systemic approach providing an integrated perspective the entire system (operator environment - vehicle - environment). The lecture will address people who work in roads and railways, aviation and the maritime sector, highlighting some of the latest trends in human factors and ergonomics. In addition, knowledge of the human factor in understanding relationships and safety levels is gaining importance both in scientific research and in the development of modern and future transport systems, including road and rail vehicles, as well as air and sea transport. Significant progress concerns both modern accident analysis methods, vehicle automation, distractions and distractions, safety, situational awareness, development and training of skills and workload.

Literatura:

Aviation

1. Anderson, G. E. (1918). Aeroplane accidents. Journal of the Royal Navy Medical Service, 1, 51-68.

2. Boeing. (2003). Statistical summary of commercial jet aircraft accidents. Seattle WA: Author.

3. Dekker, S. (2014). The Field Guide to Understanding 'Human Error'. Farnham: Ashgate.

4. Garrett, J. W., Teizer, J. (2009). Human factors analysis classification system relating to human error awareness taxonomy in construction safety. Journal of Construc- tion Engineering & Management, 135, 8, 754-763.

5. Goglia, J. J., & Stolzer, A. J. (2016). Safety Management Systems in Aviation. London: Routledge.

6. Gower, Hillson, D., & Murray-Webster, R. (2008). Managing group risk attitude. Aldershot: Gower. ICAO. (2009). Safety Management Manual (2nd ed.). Quebec: ICAO

7. Harris, D. 2011. Human Performance on the Flight Deck. Aldershot: Ashgate.

8. Harris, D., and N. A. Stanton. 2010. “Aviation as a System of Systems: Preface to the Special Issue of Human Factors in Aviation.” Ergonomics 53 (2):145–148. doi:10.1080/00140130903521587.

9. Salmon, P. M., G. H. Walker, G. J. Read, N. Goode, and N. A. Stanton. 2017. “Fitting Methods to Paradigms: are Ergonomics Methods Fit for Systems Thinking?” Ergonomics 60 (2):194–205. doi:10.1080/ 00140139.2015.1103385.

10. Schmid, D., and N. A. Stanton. 2018. “How Are Laser Attacks Encountered in Commercial Aviation? A Hazard Analysis Based on Systems Theory.” Safety Science 110:178–191. doi:10.1016/ j.ssci.2018.08.012.

11. Short, C., Tchouamou Njoya, E., & Hubbard, N. (2019). Safety Risk Attitudes in Commercial Aviation. In R. Charles, & D. Golightly (Eds.), Contemporary Ergonomics and Human Factors 2019 Chartered Institute of Ergonomics & Human Factors

12. Stanton, N. A., D. Harris, and A. Starr. 2016. “The Future Flight Deck: Modelling Dual, single and Distributed Crewing Options.” Applied Ergonomics 53:331–342. doi:10.1016/j.apergo.2015.06.019.

13. Stanton, N. A., and C. Harvey. 2017. “Beyond Human Error Taxonomies in Assessment of Risk in Sociotechnical Systems: A New Paradigm with the EAST ’Broken-Links’ Approach.” Ergonomics 60 (2):221–233. doi:10.1080/00140139.2016.1232841.

14. Stanton, N. A., K. L. Plant, A. P. Roberts, C. Harvey, and T. G. Thomas. 2016. “Extending Helicopter Operations to Meet Future Integrated

15. Updegrove, J.A. and Jafer, S. (2017). Optimization of air traffic control training at the Federal Aviation Administration Academy. Aerospace, vol. 4, iss. 4. Availa- ble at: https://www.mdpi.com/2226-4310/4/4/50

Maritime:

1. Acock, A. C. 2005. “Working with Missing Values.” Journal of Marriage and Family 67 (4): 1012–1028. doi:10.1111/ jomf.2005.67.issue-4.

2. Akhtar, M. J., and I. B. Utne. 2015. “Common Patterns in Aggregated Accident Analysis Charts from Human Fatigue-Related Groundings and Collisions at Sea.” Maritime Policy & Management 42: 186–206. doi:10.1080/ 03088839.2014.926032.

3. Antonsen, S., P. Almklov, and J. Fenstad. 2008. “Reducing the Gap between Procedures and Practice: Lessons from a Successful Safety Intervention.” Safety Science Monitor 12: 1–16.

4. Beus, J. M., S. C. Payne, M. E. Bergman, and W. Arthur Jr. 2010. “Safety Climate and Injuries: An Examination of Theoretical and Empirical Relationships.” Journal of Applied Psychology 95: 713–727. doi:10.1037/a0019164. Bieder, C., and M. Bourrier. 2013. Trapping Safety into Rules. How Desirable or Avoidable Is Proceduralization? Farnham: Ashgate.

5. Operations.” Safety Science 47: 569–577. doi:10.1016/j.ssci.2008.07.002.

6. Hofmann, D. A., and A. Stetzer. 1996. “A Cross-level Investigation of Factors Influencing Unsafe Behaviors and Accidents.” Personnel Psychology 49: 307–339. doi:10.1111/peps.1996.49.issue-2.

7. Grech, M. R., T. J. Horberry, and T. Koester. 2008. Human Factors in the Maritime Domain. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press.

8. Karahalios, H., Z. L. Yang, and J. Wang. 2015. “A Risk Appraisal System regarding the Implementation of Maritime Regulations by a Ship Operator.” Maritime Policy & Management 42: 389–413. doi:10.1080/ 03088839.2013.873548.

9. King, J. 1979. “The Adequacy of Ships and the Competence of Seaman.” Maritime Policy & Management 6 (1): 1–3.

10. Mullen, J. 2004. “Investigating Factors that Influence Individual Safety Behavior at Work.” Journal of Safety Research 35: 275–285. doi:10.1016/j.jsr.2004.03.011.

11. Reason, J. 1997. Managing the Risks of Organizational Accidents. Farnham: Ashgate.

Rundmo, T. 1996. “Associations between Risk Perception and Safety.” Safety Science 24: 197–209.

12. Schröder-Hinrichs, J. U., E. Hollnagel, and M. Baldauf. 2012. “From Titanic to Costa Concordia—

13. A Century of Lessons Not Learned.” WMU Journal of Maritime Affairs 11 (2): 151–167. Shapell, S. A., and D. A. Wiegmann. 2001. “Applying Reason: The Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS).” Human Factors and Aerospace Safety 1: 59–86.

14. Weick, K. E., and K. M. Sutcliffe. 2007. Managing the Unexpected. Resilient Performance in an Age of Uncertainty. 2nd San Francisco: John Wiley & Sons.

Zohar, D. 1980. “Safety Climate in Industrial Organizations: Theoretical and Applied Implications.” Journal of Applied Psychology 65: 96–102. doi:10.1037/0021-9010.65.1.96.

Road:

1. Aworemi J. R., Adegoke A-A. I., Oyedokun A. J., & Adewoye J. O., (2010). “Efficacy of Drivers’ Fatigue on Road Accident in Selected Southwestern States of Nigeria”. International Business Research. Vol. 3, No. 3; July 2010.

2. Canadian Automobile Association (CAA) “Distracted Driving laws in Canada”. https://www.caa.ca/distracted- driving/distracted-driving-laws-incanada/Accessed 6/27/2017 .

3. Daziano R. A., Sarrias M., & Leard B., (2017). “Are consumers willing to pay to let cars drive for them? Analysing response to Autonomous vehicles”. Transportation Research Part C 78 (2017) 150–164.

4. Decker J. S., Stannard S. J., McManus B., Wittig S. M. O., Sisiopiku V. P., & Stavrinos D., (2015). “The Impact of Billboards on Driver Visual Behavior: A Systematic Literature Review”. PMC. NCBI.

5. Durić P., & Miladinov-Mikov M. (2008) “Some characteristics of drivers having caused traffic accidents”. Med Pregl. 61(9- 10):464-9. 3062 Accessed 12/28/2017

Edquist J., (2008). “The Effects of Visual Clutter on Driving Performance”. Accident Research Center. Monash University.

6. Foss R. D., & Goodwin A.H., (2014). “Distracted Driver Behaviors and Distracting Conditions Among Adolescent Drivers: Findings from a Naturalistic Driving Study”. Kyriakidis M., Happee R., & de Winter J.C.F. (2015). “Public opinion on automated driving: Results of an international questionnaire among 5000 respondents”. Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour. Volume 32, July 2015, Pages 127-140.

7. Mofolasayo A., (2019). ‘A research guide for using the efficiency of technological innovations in automobiles to establishing unbiased policies for improvement of minimum safety standards for driver operated motor vehicles.’ Proceedings of the 53rd Annual Conference. Canadian Transportation Research Forum (Accepted). Vancouver, May 2019

8. Roberts P., Boddington K., Rodwell L., & Jorgensen D., (2013). “Impact of Roadside Advertising on Road Safety – Austroads Research Report” Austroads Publication No. AP-R420-13.

9. Roess R. P., Prassas E. S., & McShane W. R., (2011) “Traffic Engineering – Fourth Edition”. Pearson Higher Education Inc. NJ. Sewell R. A., Poling J., & Sofuoglu M., (2009). “The effect of Cannabis compared with Alcohol on driving” PMC. US National Library of Medicine. National Institute of Health

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Rail:

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2. British Rail Safety and Standards Board (2016b). Fitness for Duty Checks and Predicting the Likelihood of Experiencing Fatigue. Available online at: https://www.rssb.co.uk/Pages/research-catalogue/PB025460.aspx

3. Cebola, N., Golightly, D., Wilson, J. R., and Lowe, E. (2013). “Fatigue, anxiety, performance for on-call safety critical decision makers in rail maintenance: a diary study,” in Rail Human Factors: Supporting Reliability, Safety and Cost Reduction, eds N. Dadashi, A. Scott, J.R. Wilson, and A. Mills (Boca Raton, FL: Taylor and Francis Group), 328–336.

4. Cercarelli, L. R., and Ryan, G. A. (1996). “Long distance driving behaviour of Western Australian drivers,” in Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Fatigue and Transportation: Engineering, Enforcement and Education Solutions, ed L. Hartley (Fremantle, WA: Promaco Conventions Pty), 35–45.

5. Dunn, N., and Williamson, A. (2012). Driving monotonous routes in a train simulator: the effect of task demand on driving performance and subjective experience. Ergonomics 55, 997–1008. doi: 10.1080/00140139.2012.691994

6. Fan, J., and Smith, A. P. (2017). “The impact of workload and fatigue on performance,” in International Symposium on Human Mental Workload: Models and Applications, eds L. Longo and M. C. Leva (Cham: Springer), 90–105.

7. Fan, J., and Smith, A. P. (2018). The mediating effect of fatigue on work-life balance positive well-being in railway staff. Open J. Soc. Sci.

8. Kecklund, L., Ingre, M., Kecklund, G., Söderström, M., Åkerstedt, T., Lindberg, E., et al. (2001). “The TRAIN-project: railway safety and the train driver information environment and work situation – a summary of the main results,” in Paper Presented at the Signalling Safety 2001 (London).

9. *Kibblewhite, C. (2003) A Qualitative Study of Factors Contributing to Train Driver Inattention and Distraction. MSc thesis, Cranfield University, Cranfield.

10. Kogi, K., and Ohta, T. (1975). Incidence of near accidental drowsing in locomotive driving during a period of rotation. J. Hum. Ergol. 4, 65–76. doi: 10.11183/jhe1972.4.65

11. CREAM analysis of hazardous incidents occurring on approach to rail signals. Safety Sci. 66, 92–100. doi: 10.1016/j.ssci.2014.02.003

12. Ugajin, H. (1999). Human factors approach to railway safety. Q. Rep. RTRI 40, 5–8. doi: 10.2219/rtriqr.40.5

13. Young, M. S., Brookhuis, K. A., Wickens, C. D., and Hancock, P. A. (2015). State of science: mental workload in ergonomics. Ergonomics58, 1–17. doi: 10.1080/00140139.2014.956151

14. Zoer, I., Ruitenburg, M. M., Botje, D., Frings-Dresen, M. H., and Sluiter, J. K. (2011). The associations between psychosocial workload and mental health complaints in different age groups. Ergonomics 54, 943–952. doi: 10.1080/00140139.2011.606920

Wymagania wstępne:

good command of English, interest in transport psychology, willingness to seek new information related to psychological aspects of human activities in the diffrent situation, good knowledge of creating Powerpoint presentations in the standard of scientific conferences and efficient acquisition of information from researchers of internet search engines

Opisy przedmiotów w USOS i USOSweb są chronione prawem autorskim.
Właścicielem praw autorskich jest Uniwersytet Kardynała Stefana Wyszyńskiego w Warszawie.