Uniwersytet Kardynała Stefana Wyszyńskiego w Warszawie - Centralny System Uwierzytelniania
Strona główna

Cultural Transfer and Intercultural Communication in Anglophone Literatures

Informacje ogólne

Kod przedmiotu: WH-KON-U2-ComAngL
Kod Erasmus / ISCED: (brak danych) / (brak danych)
Nazwa przedmiotu: Cultural Transfer and Intercultural Communication in Anglophone Literatures
Jednostka: Wydział Nauk Humanistycznych
Grupy:
Punkty ECTS i inne: 6.00 Podstawowe informacje o zasadach przyporządkowania punktów ECTS:
  • roczny wymiar godzinowy nakładu pracy studenta konieczny do osiągnięcia zakładanych efektów uczenia się dla danego etapu studiów wynosi 1500-1800 h, co odpowiada 60 ECTS;
  • tygodniowy wymiar godzinowy nakładu pracy studenta wynosi 45 h;
  • 1 punkt ECTS odpowiada 25-30 godzinom pracy studenta potrzebnej do osiągnięcia zakładanych efektów uczenia się;
  • tygodniowy nakład pracy studenta konieczny do osiągnięcia zakładanych efektów uczenia się pozwala uzyskać 1,5 ECTS;
  • nakład pracy potrzebny do zaliczenia przedmiotu, któremu przypisano 3 ECTS, stanowi 10% semestralnego obciążenia studenta.
Język prowadzenia: (brak danych)
Poziom przedmiotu:

podstawowy

Symbol/Symbole kierunkowe efektów uczenia się:

wpisz symbol/symbole efektów kształcenia


S1A_W05 - ma podstawową wiedzę o człowieku, w szczególności jako podmiocie konstytuującym struktury społeczne i zasady ich funkcjonowania, a także działającym w tych strukturach


S2A_W05- ma rozszerzoną wiedzę o człowieku jako twórcy kultury, pogłębioną w odniesieniu do wybranych obszarów aktywności człowieka


Wymagania wstępne:

Conservatory English and fluency in reading are required

Skrócony opis:

This course considers the growing dynamics of cross-cultural relations in the last decades and focuses on major problems of intercultural communication. It aims at defining them in a wider context that includes not only the discussion of basic concepts and theoretical positions, but also the study of specific examples of intercultural mediation in Anglophone literatures and cultures. One of the most important goals the course sets itself is to demonstrate how analyzing migrant processes and exophonic literary works (produced by writers who do not write in their native languages), helps discern the role of literature in intercultural mediation. Through exercises and discussions, students are expected to develop skills of analyzing cultural identities, interactions and transitions, and to embrace attitudes of appreciating cultural difference.

Pełny opis:

Keywords: culture (subcultures, co-cultures, subgroups and microcultures); ethnicity; intercultural communication; literature as a means of cultural interaction; borders and crossings; map-making and notional geographies; postcolonialism; migration; diaspora and diasporic cultures; exophony; Anglophone literatures; cultural translation; cultural identities.

Thematic plan

1. Culture as a context for communication: defining concepts (2hrs)

- Basic cultural concepts and types of culture - subcultures, co-cultures, subgroups, and microcultures;

- Subcultures and ethnicities;

- Subcultures or co-cultures?

- Are subgroups cultural forms of deviation?

- Are microcultures “inferior cultures”?

- Cultural definitions of communication;

- The media of intercultural communication;

- Literature as a form of intercultural communication.

2. Intercultural communication and migrant writing: boundaries and crossings (2hrs)

- Borders: actual and/or constructed?

- Drawing lines: Michel Foucault and the power of discourse;

- Discourses that conduct difference: Edward Said’s Orientalism;

- East, West, Middle East, Orient, Occident as culturally imagined categories.

3. Problems of cultural translation (2hrs)

The lecture focuses on the evolution of translation studies with a particular focus on Susan Bassnett’s perspective on its cultural turn.

- source-oriented and target-oriented translation theories;

- cultural factors in translation;

- global languages versus minor literatures – questions of cultural identity and communicative value.

4. The Middle East in Diaspora (2hrs)

- The concept of diaspora;

- Relational self-location;

- Literary responses;

- Arabesque.

5. Anglophone writers from the Middle East: Elif Shafak. Workshop on Shafak’s TED talk “The Politics of Fiction“. After listening to the talk, a discussion will be held on major issues raised in her speech ( 2hrs).

“The Politics of Fiction“:

https://www.ted.com/talks/elif_shafak_the_politics_of_fiction

6. Self-Orientalism. Discussion of Shafak‘s novel Honour (2 hrs)

The narrative follows the transformation of the family from its traditional, local and rigidly protected form into a contemporary open and understanding „meeting ground” of both the source and the target cultures.

7. Diana Abu-Jaber: diasporal self-location of second-generation migrants (2hrs)

• Born in Syracuse, New York, as an Arab-Palestinian member of the Arab diaspora in the US.

• She spent some time in Amman, Jordan (her father’s birthplace)

• She likewise confesses that “my [American] mother [of German, European descent] has taught me […] how to listen to stories. She made a space in our home for my father to invent himself…”

• Diasporal self-location of second-generation migrants is often semi-fictional (through memories, stories, dreams)

• Abu-Jaber works include: Arabian Jazz, Origin, Birds of Paradise, and two memoirs, The Language of Baklava and Life without a Recipe.

• The role of story-telling and cooking: major tools of cross-cultural interaction in the novel.

• Laila Halaby and 09/11/2001 (workshop on Once in a Promised Land) – 2hrs

• Born in Lebanon;

• Arizona-based writer of Palestinian Jordanian and American background;

• Has published two novels: West of the Jordan and Once in a Promised Land (both winning prestigious awards) and a collection of poems My Name on His Tongue;

• Her work examines the social and cultural positions of Palestinians in the US involving issues about Arab American identity, civil liberties, racism and xenophobia, alongside the effects of 9/11.

8. Bulgarian-born Kapka Kassabova’s Anglophone cultural maps (4hrs)

Kapka Kassabova was born and raised in Bulgaria in the 1970s and 1980s, and educated at the French College in Sofia. Her family emigrated to New Zealand just after the fall of the Berlin Wall, and she spent her late teens and twenties there where she published two poetry collections All Roads Lead to the Sea (1997) and the Commonwealth-Writers Prize winner for debut fiction in Asia Pacific Reconnaissance (1999).

In 2004, Kapka moved to Scotland and published Street Without a Name (2008). It is a story of the last Communist childhood and an unsentimental journey across post-communist Bulgaria, and was shortlisted for the Prix Européen du Livre and the Dolman Travel Book Award.

The music memoir Twelve Minutes of Love (2011), a tale of Argentine tango, obsession and the search for home, was shortlisted for the Scottish Mortgage Investment Trust Book Awards. Villa Pacifica (2011), a mystery novel with an equatorial setting, came out at the same time. Her memoir Border: A Journey to the Edge of Europe (2017) was shortlisted for the Baillie Gifford Prize.

Her essays and articles have appeard in The Guardian, The Times Literary Supplement, Vogue, The Sunday Times, The Scottish Review of Books, The NZ Listener, Grant and on BBC Radio 3 and 4.

9. Native American cultures in the course of constant relocation: Louise Erdrich’s cross-border works. Part 1 (2hrs)

The lecture will discuss the problematic relationship between orality and the written word in a sample of Native American writing. Louise Erdrich’s work partakes of the growing trend in Native American art and literature and, as a whole, Native American Studies, to reconsider the traumatic event of colonization and its aftermath, and in this act of re-membering, to find strategies of self-relocation in the fragmented whereabouts of today’s world. Erdrich and the writers of her generation are extremely sensitive to the condition of unbelonging which is the logical consequence of the state of multiple belonging. For Native American peoples, this sense of severing has even deeper implications as they tend to assert individual identity in a very particular form of kinship within their community, which consists of family members, people, places, animals, the world of the deceased, the world of the Great Spirits. When deprived of the orality that had once provided them with the means to reconnect themselves to mythical reality, and the native language that would operate as the magical password, Native American writers impart intensely performative properties to the language they use and their writing serves to establish new, meaningful connections to the multiple worlds that sustain their community.

10. Louise Erdrich’s cross-border works. Part 2.

Analytical reading of her poem “Fooling God“ (2hrs)

11. Islands and “insularity” in the autobiographical Anglophone writings of Stephanos Stephanides (2 - 4hrs)

The lecture will discuss the work of a less-known island-born writer who writes in English. Born in a Cypriot village, Stephanos Stephanides joined his father who left for England when Stephanides was only eight. In his childhood years he spent time with his mother’s parents back in Cyprus, but finally settled in Bristol and graduated from Cardiff University in 1973. Three years later he left the UK and lived and travelled in Greece, Spain, and Portugal, Guyana and Washington DC where he worked as a professional translator and conference interpreter, researcher, writer and film-maker. In 1991 he returned to Cyprus and presently he reads lectures in English and Comparative Literature at the University of Cyprus. His works – poetry, fiction and non-fiction – can be read in the context of emerging and well-established crossways in the contemporary cultures of enhanced mobility. The Wind Under My Lips is his recently published memoir in which he remembers his origins in a language that veers between different linguistic identities. We will observe how this ambiguous self-location articulates insularity as a hub of departures and arrivals while raising questions about how much insular forms/languages/cultures transform with growing globalization.

12. Final student presentations (2 – 4 hrs), depending on the number of students

Literatura:

Bennett, Milton J. Basic Concepts of Intercultural Communication. Intercultural Press, 1998, 2013. Print/Web.

Foucault, Michel. "Of Other Spaces. Utopias and Heterotopias.” Diacritics, vol. 16, 1986, pp. 22-27.

Frank, Søren. Migration and Literature. Gunter Grass, Milan Kundera, Salman Rushdie and Jan Kjœrstad. Palgrave Macmillan, 2008.

Ingold, Tim. Lines. A Brief History. Routledge, 2007.

Ivanova, Petya Tsoneva. Negotiating Borderlines in Four Contemporary Migrant Writers from the Middle East. Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2018. The book is available at the Centre for English and Irish Studies, University of Veliko Tarnovo, Bulgaria.

---. "The "Passing Clouds" of Nationalism in Anthea Nicholson and Kapka Kassabova: Cross-Border Recollection of Political Trauma." University of Bucharest Review, vol. IX, no. 1, pp. 75-82.

Jandt, Fred E. An Introduction to Intercultural Communication. Identities in a Global Community. Sage, 2018. Print/Web.

Kostova, Ludmilla. “Victimization and Its Cures: Representations of South Eastern Europe in British Fiction and Drama of the 1990s.” Betraying the Event: Constructions of Victimhood in Contemporary Cultures, edited by Fatima Festić, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2009.

---. “Writing across the Native/Foreign Divide: The Case of Kapka Kassabova’s Street Without a Name.” Travel and Ethics. Theory and Practice, edited by Corinne Fowler, Charles Forsdick and Ludmilla Kostova. Routledge, 2013.

Kuhiwczak. Piotr and Karin Littau, eds. A Companion to Translation Studies. Multilingual Matters, 2007.

Maitland, Sarah. What is Cultural Translation? Bloomsbury Academic, 2017. Print/Web.

Martin, Judith N. and Thomas Nakayama. Intercultural Communication in Contexts. McGraw Hill, 2010, 2018. Print/Web.

Said, Edward. Orientalism. Penguin Books, 1991.

Samovar, Larry A. Intercultural Communication. A Reader. Cengage Learning, 2006, 2015. Print/Web.

Zabus, Chantal. The African Palimpsest: Indigenization of Language in the West African Europhone Novel. Rodopi, 2007.

Ting-Toomey, Stella and Leeva C. Chung. Understanding Intercultural Communication. Oxford UP, 2005, 2012.

Electronic resources:

Links to the BBC Series The Adventures of English (featuring the historical development of English):

Episode 1 “Birth of a Language” - BBC Documentary at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K1XQx9pGGd0

The Adventure Of English - Episode 2 “English Goes Underground” at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DG7REAOG1kc

The Adventure Of English - Episode 3 – “The Battle for the Language of the Bible” at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQLYcfuUdjs

The Adventure Of English - Episode 4 “This Earth, This Realm, This England” at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Kg63k5JDH8 (about Shakespeare)

The Adventure Of English - Episode 6 “Speaking Proper” at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVH6LdoEDNs (about the Age of Reason)

The Adventure of English – Episode 7 “The Language of Empire” (the Victorian Age) at https://youtu.be/SygpJAwypeo

The Adventure of English – Episode 8 “Many Tongues Called English” (contemporary times) at https://youtu.be/8xJVLnoY-cM

Efekty kształcenia i opis ECTS:

S1A_W05 - ma podstawową wiedzę o człowieku, w szczególności jako podmiocie konstytuującym struktury społeczne i zasady ich funkcjonowania, a także działającym w tych strukturach

S2A_W05- ma rozszerzoną wiedzę o człowieku jako twórcy kultury, pogłębioną w odniesieniu do wybranych obszarów aktywności człowieka

Metody i kryteria oceniania:

Lecture and seminar attendance, regular assessment of class work, and student presentations will form the semester grade.

Grading criteria: student attendance, class work (discussions etc.), end-of-course presentations.

Learning outcomes

Students will be able to understand the importance of main trends and subjects presented in English and Anglophone Literatures (XX-XXI c.). From a theoretical point of view students will be able to confront different schools and authors in order to understand language and literary communication in modern English and Anglophone Literatures.

Assessment methods

- Oral presentation (teamwork) - 60%

- Individual short exercise - 30%

- Participation in class - 10%

Assessment Methodology:

Each subject will be firstly provided as a lecture on the particular Issue, then further discussed in accordance with further readings allocated for presentations and obligatorily written by students.

Grade based on triple factorial assessment :

1.Attendance (up to three absence allowed)

2. Activity (constant assessment based on student activities during the spam of the course and academic knowledge of required readings.)

3 Attendance in the workshops

Conservatory English and fluency in reading are required

Praktyki zawodowe:

n/a

Zajęcia w cyklu "Semestr zimowy 2022/23" (zakończony)

Okres: 2022-10-01 - 2023-01-31
Wybrany podział planu:
Przejdź do planu
Typ zajęć:
Konwersatorium, 30 godzin więcej informacji
Koordynatorzy: Dorota Dąbrowska, Piotr Dejneka, Petya Tsoneva Ivanova, Joanna Zajkowska
Prowadzący grup: Piotr Dejneka, Petya Tsoneva Ivanova
Lista studentów: (nie masz dostępu)
Zaliczenie: Zaliczenie na ocenę
Opis nakładu pracy studenta w ECTS:

Participation in classes - 30h

Preparation for classes - 20h

Consultations - 10h

Preparation of presentation and workshop- 30h

15h = 1 ECTS point


Typ przedmiotu:

obowiązkowy

Grupa przedmiotów ogólnouczenianych:

nie dotyczy

Skrócony opis:

This course considers the growing dynamics of cross-cultural relations in the last decades and focuses on major problems of intercultural communication. It aims at defining them in a wider context that includes not only the discussion of basic concepts and theoretical positions, but also the study of specific examples of intercultural mediation in Anglophone literatures and cultures. One of the most important goals the course sets itself is to demonstrate how analyzing migrant processes and exophonic literary works (produced by writers who do not write in their native languages), helps discern the role of literature in intercultural mediation. Through exercises and discussions, students are expected to develop skills of analyzing cultural identities, interactions and transitions, and to embrace attitudes of appreciating cultural difference.

Pełny opis:

Keywords: culture (subcultures, co-cultures, subgroups and microcultures); ethnicity; intercultural communication; literature as a means of cultural interaction; borders and crossings; map-making and notional geographies; postcolonialism; migration; diaspora and diasporic cultures; exophony; Anglophone literatures; cultural translation; cultural identities.

Thematic plan

1. Culture as a context for communication: defining concepts (2hrs)

- Basic cultural concepts and types of culture - subcultures, co-cultures, subgroups, and microcultures;

- Subcultures and ethnicities;

- Subcultures or co-cultures?

- Are subgroups cultural forms of deviation?

- Are microcultures “inferior cultures”?

- Cultural definitions of communication;

- The media of intercultural communication;

- Literature as a form of intercultural communication.

2. Intercultural communication and migrant writing: boundaries and crossings (2hrs)

- Borders: actual and/or constructed?

- Drawing lines: Michel Foucault and the power of discourse;

- Discourses that conduct difference: Edward Said’s Orientalism;

- East, West, Middle East, Orient, Occident as culturally imagined categories.

3. Problems of cultural translation (2hrs)

The lecture focuses on the evolution of translation studies with a particular focus on Susan Bassnett’s perspective on its cultural turn.

- source-oriented and target-oriented translation theories;

- cultural factors in translation;

- global languages versus minor literatures – questions of cultural identity and communicative value.

4. The Middle East in Diaspora (2hrs)

- The concept of diaspora;

- Relational self-location;

- Literary responses;

- Arabesque.

5. Anglophone writers from the Middle East: Elif Shafak. Workshop on Shafak’s TED talk “The Politics of Fiction“. After listening to the talk, a discussion will be held on major issues raised in her speech ( 2hrs).

“The Politics of Fiction“:

https://www.ted.com/talks/elif_shafak_the_politics_of_fiction

6. Self-Orientalism. Discussion of Shafak‘s novel Honour (2 hrs)

The narrative follows the transformation of the family from its traditional, local and rigidly protected form into a contemporary open and understanding „meeting ground” of both the source and the target cultures.

7. Diana Abu-Jaber: diasporal self-location of second-generation migrants (2hrs)

• Born in Syracuse, New York, as an Arab-Palestinian member of the Arab diaspora in the US.

• She spent some time in Amman, Jordan (her father’s birthplace)

• She likewise confesses that “my [American] mother [of German, European descent] has taught me […] how to listen to stories. She made a space in our home for my father to invent himself…”

• Diasporal self-location of second-generation migrants is often semi-fictional (through memories, stories, dreams)

• Abu-Jaber works include: Arabian Jazz, Origin, Birds of Paradise, and two memoirs, The Language of Baklava and Life without a Recipe.

• The role of story-telling and cooking: major tools of cross-cultural interaction in the novel.

• Laila Halaby and 09/11/2001 (workshop on Once in a Promised Land) – 2hrs

• Born in Lebanon;

• Arizona-based writer of Palestinian Jordanian and American background;

• Has published two novels: West of the Jordan and Once in a Promised Land (both winning prestigious awards) and a collection of poems My Name on His Tongue;

• Her work examines the social and cultural positions of Palestinians in the US involving issues about Arab American identity, civil liberties, racism and xenophobia, alongside the effects of 9/11.

8. Bulgarian-born Kapka Kassabova’s Anglophone cultural maps (4hrs)

Kapka Kassabova was born and raised in Bulgaria in the 1970s and 1980s, and educated at the French College in Sofia. Her family emigrated to New Zealand just after the fall of the Berlin Wall, and she spent her late teens and twenties there where she published two poetry collections All Roads Lead to the Sea (1997) and the Commonwealth-Writers Prize winner for debut fiction in Asia Pacific Reconnaissance (1999).

In 2004, Kapka moved to Scotland and published Street Without a Name (2008). It is a story of the last Communist childhood and an unsentimental journey across post-communist Bulgaria, and was shortlisted for the Prix Européen du Livre and the Dolman Travel Book Award.

The music memoir Twelve Minutes of Love (2011), a tale of Argentine tango, obsession and the search for home, was shortlisted for the Scottish Mortgage Investment Trust Book Awards. Villa Pacifica (2011), a mystery novel with an equatorial setting, came out at the same time. Her memoir Border: A Journey to the Edge of Europe (2017) was shortlisted for the Baillie Gifford Prize.

Her essays and articles have appeard in The Guardian, The Times Literary Supplement, Vogue, The Sunday Times, The Scottish Review of Books, The NZ Listener, Grant and on BBC Radio 3 and 4.

9. Native American cultures in the course of constant relocation: Louise Erdrich’s cross-border works. Part 1 (2hrs)

The lecture will discuss the problematic relationship between orality and the written word in a sample of Native American writing. Louise Erdrich’s work partakes of the growing trend in Native American art and literature and, as a whole, Native American Studies, to reconsider the traumatic event of colonization and its aftermath, and in this act of re-membering, to find strategies of self-relocation in the fragmented whereabouts of today’s world. Erdrich and the writers of her generation are extremely sensitive to the condition of unbelonging which is the logical consequence of the state of multiple belonging. For Native American peoples, this sense of severing has even deeper implications as they tend to assert individual identity in a very particular form of kinship within their community, which consists of family members, people, places, animals, the world of the deceased, the world of the Great Spirits. When deprived of the orality that had once provided them with the means to reconnect themselves to mythical reality, and the native language that would operate as the magical password, Native American writers impart intensely performative properties to the language they use and their writing serves to establish new, meaningful connections to the multiple worlds that sustain their community.

10. Louise Erdrich’s cross-border works. Part 2.

Analytical reading of her poem “Fooling God“ (2hrs)

11. Islands and “insularity” in the autobiographical Anglophone writings of Stephanos Stephanides (2 - 4hrs)

The lecture will discuss the work of a less-known island-born writer who writes in English. Born in a Cypriot village, Stephanos Stephanides joined his father who left for England when Stephanides was only eight. In his childhood years he spent time with his mother’s parents back in Cyprus, but finally settled in Bristol and graduated from Cardiff University in 1973. Three years later he left the UK and lived and travelled in Greece, Spain, and Portugal, Guyana and Washington DC where he worked as a professional translator and conference interpreter, researcher, writer and film-maker. In 1991 he returned to Cyprus and presently he reads lectures in English and Comparative Literature at the University of Cyprus. His works – poetry, fiction and non-fiction – can be read in the context of emerging and well-established crossways in the contemporary cultures of enhanced mobility. The Wind Under My Lips is his recently published memoir in which he remembers his origins in a language that veers between different linguistic identities. We will observe how this ambiguous self-location articulates insularity as a hub of departures and arrivals while raising questions about how much insular forms/languages/cultures transform with growing globalization.

12. Final student presentations (2 – 4 hrs), depending on the number of students

Literatura:

Bennett, Milton J. Basic Concepts of Intercultural Communication. Intercultural Press, 1998, 2013. Print/Web.

Foucault, Michel. "Of Other Spaces. Utopias and Heterotopias.” Diacritics, vol. 16, 1986, pp. 22-27.

Frank, Søren. Migration and Literature. Gunter Grass, Milan Kundera, Salman Rushdie and Jan Kjœrstad. Palgrave Macmillan, 2008.

Ingold, Tim. Lines. A Brief History. Routledge, 2007.

Ivanova, Petya Tsoneva. Negotiating Borderlines in Four Contemporary Migrant Writers from the Middle East. Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2018. The book is available at the Centre for English and Irish Studies, University of Veliko Tarnovo, Bulgaria.

---. "The "Passing Clouds" of Nationalism in Anthea Nicholson and Kapka Kassabova: Cross-Border Recollection of Political Trauma." University of Bucharest Review, vol. IX, no. 1, pp. 75-82.

Jandt, Fred E. An Introduction to Intercultural Communication. Identities in a Global Community. Sage, 2018. Print/Web.

Kostova, Ludmilla. “Victimization and Its Cures: Representations of South Eastern Europe in British Fiction and Drama of the 1990s.” Betraying the Event: Constructions of Victimhood in Contemporary Cultures, edited by Fatima Festić, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2009.

---. “Writing across the Native/Foreign Divide: The Case of Kapka Kassabova’s Street Without a Name.” Travel and Ethics. Theory and Practice, edited by Corinne Fowler, Charles Forsdick and Ludmilla Kostova. Routledge, 2013.

Kuhiwczak. Piotr and Karin Littau, eds. A Companion to Translation Studies. Multilingual Matters, 2007.

Maitland, Sarah. What is Cultural Translation? Bloomsbury Academic, 2017. Print/Web.

Martin, Judith N. and Thomas Nakayama. Intercultural Communication in Contexts. McGraw Hill, 2010, 2018. Print/Web.

Said, Edward. Orientalism. Penguin Books, 1991.

Samovar, Larry A. Intercultural Communication. A Reader. Cengage Learning, 2006, 2015. Print/Web.

Zabus, Chantal. The African Palimpsest: Indigenization of Language in the West African Europhone Novel. Rodopi, 2007.

Ting-Toomey, Stella and Leeva C. Chung. Understanding Intercultural Communication. Oxford UP, 2005, 2012.

Electronic resources:

Links to the BBC Series The Adventures of English (featuring the historical development of English):

Episode 1 “Birth of a Language” - BBC Documentary at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K1XQx9pGGd0

The Adventure Of English - Episode 2 “English Goes Underground” at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DG7REAOG1kc

The Adventure Of English - Episode 3 – “The Battle for the Language of the Bible” at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TQLYcfuUdjs

The Adventure Of English - Episode 4 “This Earth, This Realm, This England” at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Kg63k5JDH8 (about Shakespeare)

The Adventure Of English - Episode 6 “Speaking Proper” at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BVH6LdoEDNs (about the Age of Reason)

The Adventure of English – Episode 7 “The Language of Empire” (the Victorian Age) at https://youtu.be/SygpJAwypeo

The Adventure of English – Episode 8 “Many Tongues Called English” (contemporary times) at https://youtu.be/8xJVLnoY-cM

Wymagania wstępne:

Zajęcia dedykowane są studentom 2 i 3 roku pierwszego stopnia studiów stacjonarnych na kierunku filologia polska

Będą prowadzone w miesiącach grudzień 2022-styczeń 2022 w czwartki w godzinach 9.45 -13.00 w trybie zdalnym

Opisy przedmiotów w USOS i USOSweb są chronione prawem autorskim.
Właścicielem praw autorskich jest Uniwersytet Kardynała Stefana Wyszyńskiego w Warszawie.
ul. Dewajtis 5,
01-815 Warszawa
tel: +48 22 561 88 00 https://uksw.edu.pl
kontakt deklaracja dostępności USOSweb 7.0.3.0-1 (2024-04-02)