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Physical anthropology

General data

Course ID: WB-BI-24-20
Erasmus code / ISCED: 13.1 Kod klasyfikacyjny przedmiotu składa się z trzech do pięciu cyfr, przy czym trzy pierwsze oznaczają klasyfikację dziedziny wg. Listy kodów dziedzin obowiązującej w programie Socrates/Erasmus, czwarta (dotąd na ogół 0) – ewentualne uszczegółowienie informacji o dyscyplinie, piąta – stopień zaawansowania przedmiotu ustalony na podstawie roku studiów, dla którego przedmiot jest przeznaczony. / (unknown)
Course title: Physical anthropology
Name in Polish: Antropologia fizyczna
Organizational unit: Faculty of Biology and Environmental Sciences
Course groups: (in Polish) Przedmioty dla II roku biologii I stopnia
ECTS credit allocation (and other scores): 0 OR 1.00 OR 2.00 (differs over time) Basic information on ECTS credits allocation principles:
  • the annual hourly workload of the student’s work required to achieve the expected learning outcomes for a given stage is 1500-1800h, corresponding to 60 ECTS;
  • the student’s weekly hourly workload is 45 h;
  • 1 ECTS point corresponds to 25-30 hours of student work needed to achieve the assumed learning outcomes;
  • weekly student workload necessary to achieve the assumed learning outcomes allows to obtain 1.5 ECTS;
  • work required to pass the course, which has been assigned 3 ECTS, constitutes 10% of the semester student load.

view allocation of credits
Language: Polish
Subject level:

elementary

Learning outcome code/codes:

BI1_W01, BI1_W04,BI1_W05

Short description:

To acquaint students with the creation, evolution and diversity of the Homo sapiens and the position of Man among vertebrates, especially primates. The basis for understanding these processes are knowledge of anatomy and comparative physiology, the phenomena of individual development (auxology and gerontology) and adaptation to the environmental conditions.

Full description:

1. What is Anthropology

Definitions of Anthropology and historical view; How Anthropology is understood in the World; Anthropology in Poland; Physical Anthropology and its division; Anthropological studies after the First World War, during and after the Second World War.

2. Research methods in Anthropology (1)

Anthropometry and anthropological instruments; Craniometry and cranioscopy, osteometry, cephalometry and cephaloscopy, somatometry and somatoscopy; Measurements and descriptive methods in osteology; Dating procedures of skeletal remains; Interpretation of fossils.

3. Research methods in Anthropology (2)

Methods applied in living populations; New linguistic, genetic and archeological methods in anthropology

4. Phylogeny

Methods applied in human evolution: geology, paleontology, embryology, archaeology; History of Man and Primates; Morphological characteristics of Primates: locomotion categories, dental anatomy; Living Primates, distribution, common relations, reproduction, speciation, ethology, procultural behaviors.

5. Anthropogeny (1)

Origin and evolution of Homo; Causes of evolution: climatic changes and their consequences; The spread of early Man and the rise of Homo sapiens.

6. Anthropogeny (2)

Evolution of human erect body posture (bipedality); Covering the energy needs; Brain evolution; Early tool behaviors; Secondary tool processing; Biological and cultural evolution; Ethnogenesis; Sources of human variability.

7. Human population variability

Variation in human body build and Primates; Sexual dimorphism; Genetic determination of biological and psychological properties; Symmetry and asymmetry of body build; Body composition and posture; Postural faults in youths; Physiological and biochemical variation; Biological rhythms.

8. Ontogeny (1)

Rules in ontogeny development; Developmental mechanisms: growth, development, differentiation, maturation, catch-up phenomenon, neurohormonal feedback.

9. Ontogeny (2)

Developmental adjustments in ontogeny: existing now and expecting in the future; The evaluation of biological status – individuals and populations (biodemography); Changes in body proportions with age; Health, nutritional status; Measurements – norms – evaluation.

10. Species and population

Status and dynamic of human populations: structure, vital statistics (fertility and mortality), migrations; Biological status of a population; Population genetics; Natural selection, mutations, genetics of continuously distributed (quantitative) traits; Reproductive fitness.

11. Contemporary human differentiation (1)

Historical and current classification of humans: race, morphological group, ethnic group; Conceptions of inter-species variation; Race origin.

12. Contemporary human differentiation (2)

Geographic and population classification of human species; Ethnicity and race; Methods in population studies.

13. Ethnic structure in the World

Anthropological differentiation: Europe, North and South Americas, Asia, Africa, Australia and Oceania.

14. Human Ecology

Anthropology and Human Ecology; Culture as non-biological (extraorganic) form of adaptation; Material and non-material (spiritual) culture; Socio-cultural adaptations; Society and its economic development; Tradition and modernity in the way of environmental adaptation; Anthropocenosis and urbicenosis; Origin and evolution of human settlements; City – evolution and differentiation; Contemporary division of rural and urban settlements related to economics; Urbanization and industrialization.

15. Ergonomic anthropology

Status of working men interacting with techniques; The ergonomic dimensions of the body; Parameters of working places; Ergonomics and aging; Ergonomics for disable people.

Teaching methods: Lectures with PowerPoint presentations

Method of assessment: test based on the lectures

Credits in tutorials are precondition for final exam.

Bibliography:

Basic literature:

1. Jurmain R., Kilgore L., Travathan W., Ciochon R L., 2013-14. Introduction to Physical Anthropology, 14th Edition. Cengage Learning, Boston;

2. Larsen C S, 2012. Essentials of Physical Anthropology, 2-nd edition. W.W. Norton & Company, Inc., New York;

3. Lasker G.W., 1976. Physical Anthropology (second edition). Holt, Rinehart and Winston, New York;

4. Malinowski A., Strzałko J (red.), 1985. Antropologia, PWN, Warszawa-Poznań;

5. Malinowski A., Wolański N., 1988. Metody Badań w Biologii Człowieka. Wybór Metod Antropologicznych. Państwowe Wydawnictwo Naukowe, Warszawa;

6. Malinowski A., Bożiłow W., 1997, Podstawy antropometrii. Metody, techniki, normy, Wyd. Naukowe PWN, Warszawa-Łódź.

7. Moran E.F., 1982. Human Adaptability. An Introduction to Ecological Anthropology. Westview Press, Boulder;

8. Slice D.E., 2005. Modern Morphometrics in Physical Anthropology (Developments in Primatology: Progress and Prospects). Kluwer Academic / Plenum Publishers, New York.

9. Grzelak J., Nieczuja-Dwojacka J., 2013, Metody badań w antropologii, skrypt dla studentów biologii, Wydawnictwo UKSW, Warszawa.

Supplementary reading:

8. Ayala F.J., 2009. Dar Karola Darwina dla Nauki i Religii. Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego, Warszawa;

9. Futuyma D.J., 2008. Ewolucja. Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego, Warszawa;

10. Gibson G.A., 2010. Wszystko Przez Geny. Wydawnictwo Sonia Draga, Katowice;

11. Little P., 2005. Zapisane w Genach. Świat Książki, Warszawa.

Efekty kształcenia i opis ECTS:

4 ECTS; 1 ECTS=30h;

Participation in lectures: 30h

Preparation for the exam: 30h

Participation in laboratories: 30h

Supplementing the exercise book and preparing for tests: 15h

Participation in consultations: 15h

total: 120h [120/30 = 4]

Objective effects in terms of knowledge:

Objective effect 1. The student understands and can stand the basic biological phenomena and processes in physical anthropology

Subject effect 2. The student explains the terminology in physical anthropology

Objective effect 3. The student learns the research methods and instruments used in physical anthropology

Subject effects in terms of skills:

Objective effect 4. The student uses the techniques and research instruments used in physical anthropology during classes

Subject effect 5. The student uses literature in physical anthropology, both in Polish and English

Subject effect 6. The student uses digital sources to acquire knowledge in a targeted manner

Subject effect 7. The student participates in the discussion using scientific terminology

Learning outcomes in terms of social competence:

Subject effect 8. The student knows how to work in a group, adapting to perform various roles

Subject effect 9. The student learns the matters related to the exercise of the profession

Subject effect 10. The student sees the need to improve their competences, both personal and professional

Subject learning outcomes assigned to lectures (1-3).

Subject learning outcomes attributed to exercises (4-10).

Assessment methods and assessment criteria:

Lecture grade:

The final exam consists of a test exam (about 100 questions, there are 3 answers for each question and only one is correct) and open questions (from 3 to 5). The material provided during lectures applies. A student who has obtained a positive grade from passing the exercises can take the exam.

Final grade:

do 50% - 2

51-60 - 3

61-70 - 3,5

71-80 - 4

81-90 - 4,5

91-100% - 5

Exercise grade:

The final grade from the laboratories depends on the average obtained on the tests:

- Colloquium 1 - written. The test consists in describing anthropological points in the drawings.

- Colloquium 2 - practical. The colloquium consists in making anthropological measurements correctly.

- Colloquium 3 - practical. Colloquium consists in correct assessment of bone materials.

Colloquium scoring:

100-94% - 5

93-88% - 4.5

87-80 & - 4

79-70% - 3.5

69-60% - 3

59 and less - 2

The student is required to complete an exercise book during laboratories, and be able to search for and select appropriate sources (scientific articles and electronic sources, also in English). The student may have 1 unexcused absence.

Knowledge:

for grade 2 (ndst.): the student does not understand or list the basic biological phenomena and processes in the field of physical anthropology, does not explain the terminology used in class, does not learn the methods and research instruments used in physical anthropology

for grade 3 (final): the student understands and lists basic biological phenomena and processes in the field of physical anthropology at the basic level, explains the terminology used in the classes at the basic level, learns at the basic level methods and research instruments used in physical anthropology

for grade 4 (good): the student understands and lists basic biological phenomena and processes in the field of physical anthropology at a good level, explains the terminology used in class at a good level, learns at a good level methods and research instruments used in physical anthropology

5 (very good): the student understands and lists basic biological phenomena and processes in the field of physical anthropology at a very good level, explains the terminology used in class at a very good level, learns at a very good level methods and research instruments used in physical anthropology

Skills

Student:

for grade 2 (ndst.): does not use research techniques and instruments used in physical anthropology, does not use literature in the field of physical anthropology, does not use digital sources, does not acquire knowledge alone, does not take part in discussions and / or does not use terminology scientific

for grade 3 (dst.): at a sufficient level uses techniques and research instruments used in physical anthropology, at a sufficient level uses literature in the field of physical anthropology, at a sufficient level uses digital sources and acquires basic knowledge independently, at the basic level participates in discussion, uses basic scientific terminology

for grade 4 (good): a student uses a good level of techniques and research instruments used in physical anthropology, uses a good level of literature in the field of physical anthropology, uses a good level of digital sources and acquires more advanced knowledge, takes good participate in the discussion, use the correct scientific terminology

5 (very good): a student at very good level, uses techniques and research instruments used in physical anthropology, at a very good level, uses literature in the field of physical anthropology, at a very good level, uses digital sources and acquires advanced knowledge on his own, on a good level participates in the discussion, uses advanced scientific terminology

Social competence

Student:

on grade 2 (ndst.): the student is not able to work in a group and / or does not adapt to different roles in the group, the student is not familiar with the issues related to the exercise of the profession, the student does not see the need to improve competence

on grade 3 (dst.): a student on a basic level is able to work in a group and adapts to different roles in a group, a student on a basic level is familiarized with problems related to the profession, a student on a basic level sees the need to improve competences

4 (db): a good level student is able to work in a group and adapts well to different roles in a group, a good basic student is familiar with the issues related to the profession, a good basic student sees the need to improve competences, both personal as well as professional

5 (very good): the student is able to work well in a group and adapts very well to different roles in the group, the student is very familiar with the issues related to the exercise of the profession, the student can perfectly see the needs to improve competences, both personal and professional

Classes in period "Summer semester 2019/20" (past)

Time span: 2020-02-01 - 2020-09-20
Choosen plan division:


magnify
see course schedule
Type of class:
Lectures, 30 hours more information
Coordinators: Anna Siniarska-Wolańska
Group instructors: Anna Siniarska-Wolańska
Students list: (inaccessible to you)
Examination: examination
(in Polish) E-Learning:

(in Polish) E-Learning z podziałem na grupy

Type of subject:

obligatory

(in Polish) Grupa przedmiotów ogólnouczenianych:

(in Polish) nie dotyczy

Short description:

To acquaint students with the creation, evolution and diversity of the Homo sapiens and the position of Man among vertebrates, especially primates. The basis for understanding these processes are knowledge of anatomy and comparative physiology, the phenomena of individual development (auxology and gerontology) and adaptation to the environmental conditions.

Full description:

1. What is Anthropology

Definitions of Anthropology and historical view; How Anthropology is understood in the World; Anthropology in Poland; Physical Anthropology and its division; Anthropological studies after the First World War, during and after the Second World War.

2. Research methods in Anthropology (1)

Anthropometry and anthropological instruments; Craniometry and cranioscopy, osteometry, cephalometry and cephaloscopy, somatometry and somatoscopy; Measurements and descriptive methods in osteology; Dating procedures of skeletal remains; Interpretation of fossils.

3. Research methods in Anthropology (2)

Methods applied in living populations; New linguistic, genetic and archeological methods in anthropology

4. Phylogeny

Methods applied in human evolution: geology, paleontology, embryology, archaeology; History of Man and Primates; Morphological characteristics of Primates: locomotion categories, dental anatomy; Living Primates, distribution, common relations, reproduction, speciation, ethology, procultural behaviors.

5. Anthropogeny (1)

Origin and evolution of Homo; Causes of evolution: climatic changes and their consequences; The spread of early Man and the rise of Homo sapiens.

6. Anthropogeny (2)

Evolution of human erect body posture (bipedality); Covering the energy needs; Brain evolution; Early tool behaviors; Secondary tool processing; Biological and cultural evolution; Ethnogenesis; Sources of human variability.

7. Human population variability

Variation in human body build and Primates; Sexual dimorphism; Genetic determination of biological and psychological properties; Symmetry and asymmetry of body build; Body composition and posture; Postural faults in youths; Physiological and biochemical variation; Biological rhythms.

8. Ontogeny (1)

Rules in ontogeny development; Developmental mechanisms: growth, development, differentiation, maturation, catch-up phenomenon, neurohormonal feedback.

9. Ontogeny (2)

Developmental adjustments in ontogeny: existing now and expecting in the future; The evaluation of biological status – individuals and populations (biodemography); Changes in body proportions with age; Health, nutritional status; Measurements – norms – evaluation.

10. Species and population

Status and dynamic of human populations: structure, vital statistics (fertility and mortality), migrations; Biological status of a population; Population genetics; Natural selection, mutations, genetics of continuously distributed (quantitative) traits; Reproductive fitness.

11. Contemporary human differentiation (1)

Historical and current classification of humans: race, morphological group, ethnic group; Conceptions of inter-species variation; Race origin.

12. Contemporary human differentiation (2)

Geographic and population classification of human species; Ethnicity and race; Methods in population studies.

13. Ethnic structure in the World

Anthropological differentiation: Europe, North and South Americas, Asia, Africa, Australia and Oceania.

14. Human Ecology

Anthropology and Human Ecology; Culture as non-biological (extraorganic) form of adaptation; Material and non-material (spiritual) culture; Socio-cultural adaptations; Society and its economic development; Tradition and modernity in the way of environmental adaptation; Anthropocenosis and urbicenosis; Origin and evolution of human settlements; City – evolution and differentiation; Contemporary division of rural and urban settlements related to economics; Urbanization and industrialization.

15. Ergonomic anthropology

Status of working men interacting with techniques; The ergonomic dimensions of the body; Parameters of working places; Ergonomics and aging; Ergonomics for disable people.

Teaching methods: Lectures with PowerPoint presentations

Method of assessment: test based on the lectures

Credits in tutorials are precondition for final exam.

Bibliography:

Basic literature:

1. Jurmain R., Kilgore L., Travathan W., Ciochon R L., 2013-14. Introduction to Physical Anthropology, 14th Edition. Cengage Learning, Boston;

2. Larsen C S, 2012. Essentials of Physical Anthropology, 2-nd edition. W.W. Norton & Company, Inc., New York;

3. Lasker G.W., 1976. Physical Anthropology (second edition). Holt, Rinehart and Winston, New York;

4. Malinowski A., Strzałko J (red.), 1985. Antropologia, PWN, Warszawa-Poznań;

5. Malinowski A., Wolański N., 1988. Metody Badań w Biologii Człowieka. Wybór Metod Antropologicznych. Państwowe Wydawnictwo Naukowe, Warszawa;

6. Malinowski A., Bożiłow W., 1997, Podstawy antropometrii. Metody, techniki, normy, Wyd. Naukowe PWN, Warszawa-Łódź.

7. Moran E.F., 1982. Human Adaptability. An Introduction to Ecological Anthropology. Westview Press, Boulder;

8. Slice D.E., 2005. Modern Morphometrics in Physical Anthropology (Developments in Primatology: Progress and Prospects). Kluwer Academic / Plenum Publishers, New York.

9. Grzelak J., Nieczuja-Dwojacka J., 2013, Metody badań w antropologii, skrypt dla studentów biologii, Wydawnictwo UKSW, Warszawa.

Supplementary reading:

8. Ayala F.J., 2009. Dar Karola Darwina dla Nauki i Religii. Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego, Warszawa;

9. Futuyma D.J., 2008. Ewolucja. Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego, Warszawa;

10. Gibson G.A., 2010. Wszystko Przez Geny. Wydawnictwo Sonia Draga, Katowice;

11. Little P., 2005. Zapisane w Genach. Świat Książki, Warszawa.

Wymagania wstępne:

Basic/ high school knowledge in Biology

Classes in period "Summer semester 2020/21" (past)

Time span: 2021-02-01 - 2021-06-30
Choosen plan division:


magnify
see course schedule
Type of class:
Lectures, 30 hours more information
Coordinators: Anna Siniarska-Wolańska
Group instructors: Anna Siniarska-Wolańska
Students list: (inaccessible to you)
Examination: examination
(in Polish) E-Learning:

(in Polish) E-Learning

Type of subject:

obligatory

(in Polish) Grupa przedmiotów ogólnouczenianych:

(in Polish) nie dotyczy

Classes in period "Summer semester 2021/22" (past)

Time span: 2022-02-01 - 2022-06-30
Choosen plan division:


magnify
see course schedule
Type of class:
Lectures, 30 hours more information
Coordinators: Joanna Nieczuja-Dwojacka, Anna Siniarska-Wolańska
Group instructors: Alicja Budnik, Justyna Marchewka-Długońska, Joanna Nieczuja-Dwojacka
Students list: (inaccessible to you)
Examination: examination
Type of subject:

obligatory

(in Polish) Grupa przedmiotów ogólnouczenianych:

(in Polish) nie dotyczy

Short description:

To acquaint students with the creation, evolution and diversity of the Homo sapiens and the position of Man among vertebrates, especially primates. The basis for understanding these processes are knowledge of anatomy and comparative physiology, the phenomena of individual development (auxology and gerontology) and adaptation to the environmental conditions.

Full description:

1. What is Anthropology

Definitions of Anthropology and historical view; How Anthropology is understood in the World; Anthropology in Poland; Physical Anthropology and its division; Anthropological studies after the First World War, during and after the Second World War.

2. Research methods in Anthropology (1)

Anthropometry and anthropological instruments; Craniometry and cranioscopy, osteometry, cephalometry and cephaloscopy, somatometry and somatoscopy; Measurements and descriptive methods in osteology; Dating procedures of skeletal remains; Interpretation of fossils.

3. Research methods in Anthropology (2)

Methods applied in living populations; New linguistic, genetic and archeological methods in anthropology

4. Phylogeny

Methods applied in human evolution: geology, paleontology, embryology, archaeology; History of Man and Primates; Morphological characteristics of Primates: locomotion categories, dental anatomy; Living Primates, distribution, common relations, reproduction, speciation, ethology, procultural behaviors.

5. Anthropogeny (1)

Origin and evolution of Homo; Causes of evolution: climatic changes and their consequences; The spread of early Man and the rise of Homo sapiens.

6. Anthropogeny (2)

Evolution of human erect body posture (bipedality); Covering the energy needs; Brain evolution; Early tool behaviors; Secondary tool processing; Biological and cultural evolution; Ethnogenesis; Sources of human variability.

7. Human population variability

Variation in human body build and Primates; Sexual dimorphism; Genetic determination of biological and psychological properties; Symmetry and asymmetry of body build; Body composition and posture; Postural faults in youths; Physiological and biochemical variation; Biological rhythms.

8. Ontogeny (1)

Rules in ontogeny development; Developmental mechanisms: growth, development, differentiation, maturation, catch-up phenomenon, neurohormonal feedback.

9. Ontogeny (2)

Developmental adjustments in ontogeny: existing now and expecting in the future; The evaluation of biological status – individuals and populations (biodemography); Changes in body proportions with age; Health, nutritional status; Measurements – norms – evaluation.

10. Species and population

Status and dynamic of human populations: structure, vital statistics (fertility and mortality), migrations; Biological status of a population; Population genetics; Natural selection, mutations, genetics of continuously distributed (quantitative) traits; Reproductive fitness.

11. Contemporary human differentiation (1)

Historical and current classification of humans: race, morphological group, ethnic group; Conceptions of inter-species variation; Race origin.

12. Contemporary human differentiation (2)

Geographic and population classification of human species; Ethnicity and race; Methods in population studies.

13. Ethnic structure in the World

Anthropological differentiation: Europe, North and South Americas, Asia, Africa, Australia and Oceania.

14. Human Ecology

Anthropology and Human Ecology; Culture as non-biological (extraorganic) form of adaptation; Material and non-material (spiritual) culture; Socio-cultural adaptations; Society and its economic development; Tradition and modernity in the way of environmental adaptation; Anthropocenosis and urbicenosis; Origin and evolution of human settlements; City – evolution and differentiation; Contemporary division of rural and urban settlements related to economics; Urbanization and industrialization.

15. Ergonomic anthropology

Status of working men interacting with techniques; The ergonomic dimensions of the body; Parameters of working places; Ergonomics and aging; Ergonomics for disable people.

Bibliography:

Basic literature:

1. Jurmain R., Kilgore L., Travathan W., Ciochon R L., 2013-14. Introduction to Physical Anthropology, 14th Edition. Cengage Learning, Boston;

2. Larsen C S, 2012. Essentials of Physical Anthropology, 2-nd edition. W.W. Norton & Company, Inc., New York;

3. Lasker G.W., 1976. Physical Anthropology (second edition). Holt, Rinehart and Winston, New York;

4. Malinowski A., Strzałko J (red.), 1985. Antropologia, PWN, Warszawa-Poznań;

5. Malinowski A., Wolański N., 1988. Metody Badań w Biologii Człowieka. Wybór Metod Antropologicznych. Państwowe Wydawnictwo Naukowe, Warszawa;

6. Malinowski A., Bożiłow W., 1997, Podstawy antropometrii. Metody, techniki, normy, Wyd. Naukowe PWN, Warszawa-Łódź.

7. Moran E.F., 1982. Human Adaptability. An Introduction to Ecological Anthropology. Westview Press, Boulder;

8. Slice D.E., 2005. Modern Morphometrics in Physical Anthropology (Developments in Primatology: Progress and Prospects). Kluwer Academic / Plenum Publishers, New York.

Supplementary reading:

8. Ayala F.J., 2009. Dar Karola Darwina dla Nauki i Religii. Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego, Warszawa;

9. Futuyma D.J., 2008. Ewolucja. Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Warszawskiego, Warszawa;

10. Gibson G.A., 2010. Wszystko Przez Geny. Wydawnictwo Sonia Draga, Katowice;

11. Little P., 2005. Zapisane w Genach. Świat Książki, Warszawa.

Classes in period "Summer semester 2022/23" (future)

Time span: 2023-02-01 - 2023-06-30
Choosen plan division:


magnify
see course schedule
Type of class:
Lectures, 30 hours more information
Coordinators: Alicja Budnik
Group instructors: Alicja Budnik
Students list: (inaccessible to you)
Examination: examination
Type of subject:

obligatory

(in Polish) Grupa przedmiotów ogólnouczenianych:

(in Polish) nie dotyczy

Course descriptions are protected by copyright.
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